Todays child care CO

I must admit I am surprised that with the concept of Nourishing Traditions being about adopting traditional methods of preparing foods as observed in ultra-healthy non-western people groups, I expected the book on baby and child care to promote more traditional and indigenous ways of nurturing (not just nourishing) little ones, such as babywearing and co-sleeping. I guess we always have The Continuum Concept by Jean Liedloff for that!
An otoacoustic emission (OAE) is a sound which is generated from within the inner ear. Having been predicted by Thomas Gold in 1948, its existence was first demonstrated experimentally by David Kemp in 1978[1] and otoacoustic emissions have since been shown to arise through a number of different cellular and mechanical causes within the inner ear.[2][3] Studies have shown that OAEs disappear after the inner ear has been damaged, so OAEs are often used in the laboratory and the clinic as a measure of inner ear health.
- An apparent misunderstanding about baby-led weaning. The book says that baby-led weaning is to be resisted and that baby's parents should be squarely in charge of what baby eats from the beginning. I did a combination of purees and baby-led weaning with both my children, and I was always squarely in charge of what they ate and what they were offered. Part of my role as a mother is to prepare nourishing foods for my children. Whether they pick at it and hand-feed themselves or whether I offered it mushed up on a spoon is irrelevant. The book fails to recognise that a child can only choose food from that which they have been offered or is available. If only nourishing food is offered and available, then that is what the child will choose.
At Bradford Early Education, we believe that children are on their own developmental journey and that children should be challenged based on their individual interests, needs and capabilities. We endeavor to prepare our children for their academic careers by using scientific principles and empirically supported methods. As a Bradford Early Education school, we teach from a unique and independent curriculum.
This website is NOT intended to be used as a referral source.  For further assistance in finding a child care provider who can meet the unique needs of your family, please contact the Child Care Resource & Referral Agency (CCR&R) serving the county you live in by using either their state website at http://www.iowaccrr.org/ or call (toll free) 877-216-8481.

I have loved working with kids since I was 12, shadowing a family friend in her in-home daycare, until I began working there at 14. I grew up in that environment starting at age 9 however, so I was always familiar to the process, if not involved. She took children from 3 mo to 6 yrs, and from there I worked at a summer camp with kids age 5 to 11, where I also coordinated birthday parties based on the parents' requests. Meanwhile working with various clients throughout the years. I recently worked in a center as an Infant Supervisor, but I prefer 1 on 1 with families so I went back to nannying! I've just had a little one of my own at the end of July, and took a little time off for baby, but I'll be back to work at the end of October. When I am ready I would prefer a full time family that is okay with him coming along with me. If this will work for you, please get back to me! I will look forward to meeting you in the future!
At Bradford Early Education, we believe that children are on their own developmental journey and that children should be challenged based on their individual interests, needs and capabilities. We endeavor to prepare our children for their academic careers by using scientific principles and empirically supported methods. As a Bradford Early Education school, we teach from a unique and independent curriculum.
I am a stay-at-home mom and have a 7-year-old son. I have been caring for other children for 9 years now. I am very flexible with scheduling, I enjoy watching other children, along with my son, so he can have some interaction with others, which is very important to me. I can come to your home, or your child(ren) could come to mine, whichever you're more comfortable with. I do not smoke and I have my own transportation, also am just fine with pets! I have no specific rate, it just depends on what works for the parents of the child(ren), I am caring for. It's usually between $9 to $12/hour.
You ensure that your little one sees the doctor for general health care. Dental care is an important part of taking care of a child’s health, too. As a good parent you know that taking care of one’s teeth is a great habit to teach young people from a very early age. Everyone loves to show off a brilliant smile, at every age. And when kids take care of their pearly whites from a young age, they’ll maintain their beautiful smile for years to come.

“Our daughter, Juliana, joined the TLE Aurora family at 8 weeks old and we could not be happier with our choice in a childcare facility. Ms. Bethany in the Infant A room is truly amazing! We are put at ease knowing that we have such a caring and loving teacher taking care of our daughter. She is truly dedicated to making sure Juliana progresses and has fun at the same time. Juliana always has a smile on her face when I drop her off in the morning and when I pick her up in the afternoon. We truly appreciate the staff at TLE Aurora for the way they have cared for our daughter as though she was family!”


David Hayutin, DDS is your Pediatric Dentist with a gentle and caring touch. Kids may be a little ill at ease when they come to the dentist, but Dr. Hayutin’s specialty is working with youngsters and helping them achieve optimal dental health. He has been serving patients in the Denver, Colorado area since 1989. We’re highly experienced not only in children’s dental health, but also in keeping your little one calm and comfortable during their visit. In addition, we provide hospital dentistry and work with handicapped children. Our dental practice offers your young ones the best combination of experience and caring you’ll find in the Denver and Aurora, CO area.

There is a lot to like about The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care by Sally Fallon Morrell and Thomas S Cowan. Some of it is exceptionally well-researched (other things I thought were a little sketchy or questionable, see further below). I could never list all the awesome things the book discusses, but some of the highlights for me include:


In conjunction with audiometric testing, OAE testing can be completed to determine changes in the responses. Studies have found that exposure to noise can cause a decline in OAE responses. In a study, industrial workers who were exposed to 84.5 dBA of noise were compared to workers who were exposed to 53.2 dBA of noise by considering hearing thresholds and OAEs before and after 5 days of work. This study revealed that hearing thresholds and OAE results were significantly lower among the workers who were exposed to higher levels of noise.[12]
It is hard to argue that a two year old with the proposed 1:8 adult: child ratio in a group of 24 is in a “quality” or even a safe environment.  While we are pleased with the proposal to increase the number of Registered Early Childhood Educators, research suggests that an increase in trained staff is not a trade-off for decent ratios and group sizes.  Additionally, the already-stretched, underpaid, 97% female child care workforce cannot continue to pick up the slack for massive gaps in public financing.  

When I graduate in June 2016, I will officially be an ECE. Throughout my studies, discussions of low recognition of ECEs, no National Framework, low wages for ECEs, etc have been hot topics. Learning that there is such a lack of help for ECEs is alarming, especially for someone fresh out of school in hopes of having this as a career, a way to provide for a family. Looking into a National Framework in the 2017-2018 budget is not helping families, ECEs, etc who need help NOW. Now is the time to make a difference for the future. Doing something in the future doesn’t help with the problems we face now.
The relationships between otoacoustic emissions and tinnitus have been explored. Several studies suggest that in about 6% to 12% of normal-hearing persons with tinnitus and SOAEs, the SOAEs are at least partly responsible for the tinnitus.[11] Studies have found that some subjects with tinnitus display oscillating or ringing EOAEs, and in these cases, it is hypothesized that the oscillating EOAEs and tinnitus are related to a common underlying pathology rather than the emissions being the source of the tinnitus.[11]

You ensure that your little one sees the doctor for general health care. Dental care is an important part of taking care of a child’s health, too. As a good parent you know that taking care of one’s teeth is a great habit to teach young people from a very early age. Everyone loves to show off a brilliant smile, at every age. And when kids take care of their pearly whites from a young age, they’ll maintain their beautiful smile for years to come.

- A suggestion that it is not necessary to consume large amounts of water before and during pregnancy (p35). Apparently, the best way to hydrate your body is to 'consume plenty of healthy fats, because fats provide the most energy on the cellular level - much more than carbohydrates and proteins, and the by product of this energy is water'. I don't know enough about this matter to comment further at this stage, but I find it strange that drinking water would be discouraged.

OAEs are considered to be related to the amplification function of the cochlea. In the absence of external stimulation, the activity of the cochlear amplifier increases, leading to the production of sound. Several lines of evidence suggest that, in mammals, outer hair cells are the elements that enhance cochlear sensitivity and frequency selectivity and hence act as the energy sources for amplification. One theory is that they act to increase the discriminability of signal variations in continuous noise by lowering the masking effect of its cochlear amplification.[4]


Some of the child rearing advice was unexpected: p. 203 "no parents can really play with their children" because they have "too much responsibility, too many disappointments, too much school learning to play" and "Don't play with your children, just do your stuff-laundry, cooking, gardening, mowing the lawn, bird watching." Perhaps the authors began writing the section to stress the importance of letting children have creative play rather than structuring all playtime with activities and parental narration, but they composed a message of 'do your chores and leave your child to do his own thing.' Again, there were no references in this brief section, though there are plenty of sources the authors could have drawn from if they had done some research.
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