Todays child care CO

There is a lot to like about The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care by Sally Fallon Morrell and Thomas S Cowan. Some of it is exceptionally well-researched (other things I thought were a little sketchy or questionable, see further below). I could never list all the awesome things the book discusses, but some of the highlights for me include:

My son has a speech delay and is in daycare to help socialize him withother children as well as the rece’s are able to help him in ways I don’t know how as a first time parent this is a last resort as I’ve tried speech pathologist among other options this one is finally beginniNing to show some progress with these proposed changel to ratios this will be impossible young children will no longer get the necessary one on one time or quality educational curriculum also with the proposed age grouping changes many daycare facilities won’t offer infant care due to safety issues infants learning to walk put in with toddlers who are carelessly running around and in their hitting and biting phases PKEASE DO NOT GO THROUGH WITH THESE CHANGES. ~vienna Johnstone, concerned parent windsor Ontario

- An apparent misunderstanding about baby-led weaning. The book says that baby-led weaning is to be resisted and that baby's parents should be squarely in charge of what baby eats from the beginning. I did a combination of purees and baby-led weaning with both my children, and I was always squarely in charge of what they ate and what they were offered. Part of my role as a mother is to prepare nourishing foods for my children. Whether they pick at it and hand-feed themselves or whether I offered it mushed up on a spoon is irrelevant. The book fails to recognise that a child can only choose food from that which they have been offered or is available. If only nourishing food is offered and available, then that is what the child will choose.
An otoacoustic emission (OAE) is a sound which is generated from within the inner ear. Having been predicted by Thomas Gold in 1948, its existence was first demonstrated experimentally by David Kemp in 1978[1] and otoacoustic emissions have since been shown to arise through a number of different cellular and mechanical causes within the inner ear.[2][3] Studies have shown that OAEs disappear after the inner ear has been damaged, so OAEs are often used in the laboratory and the clinic as a measure of inner ear health.
Our highly acclaimed child care center is well known for its warmly decorated, home like learning environment. In classrooms, for example, we display pictures of children with their families above each student’s cubby, and our family-friendly atmosphere welcomes parent visits anytime during the school day. Our monthly events and parties acknowledge major holidays and always lend a fun, celebratory feel.
Your government contends that these changes are necessary because they will “increase access”. To the contrary, analyses by public entities and community service providers show that “new” infant rooms with a younger, narrower age range at a very high fee will close and that there will be severe financial and practical effects that affect service viability across age groups.
I must admit I am surprised that with the concept of Nourishing Traditions being about adopting traditional methods of preparing foods as observed in ultra-healthy non-western people groups, I expected the book on baby and child care to promote more traditional and indigenous ways of nurturing (not just nourishing) little ones, such as babywearing and co-sleeping. I guess we always have The Continuum Concept by Jean Liedloff for that!
Some of the child rearing advice was unexpected: p. 203 "no parents can really play with their children" because they have "too much responsibility, too many disappointments, too much school learning to play" and "Don't play with your children, just do your stuff-laundry, cooking, gardening, mowing the lawn, bird watching." Perhaps the authors began writing the section to stress the importance of letting children have creative play rather than structuring all playtime with activities and parental narration, but they composed a message of 'do your chores and leave your child to do his own thing.' Again, there were no references in this brief section, though there are plenty of sources the authors could have drawn from if they had done some research.
 I was lucky enough to come in contact with Sheila after going through numerous babysitters/child care providers who either my kids did not like or the babysitter/child care provider could no longer care for my children. After bouncing around from provider to provider, I was relieved to find Angel Camp where my girls are thrilled about spending each day there. They are very well taken care of, happy, and I have no worries about my children during the day. She keeps in good contact with me so I always know the status of my children and how their day is going. It means the world to me knowing my children are in good hands. 

The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby & Child Care makes the principles of traditional nutrition available to modern parents. The book provides holistic advice for pregnancy and newborn interventions, vaccinations, breastfeeding and child development, as well as a compendium of natural treatments for childhood illnesses, from autism to whooping cough. The work of Rudulf Steiner supports the book's emphasis on the child's spiritual requirement for imaginative play.
I am a caregiver and excited to open my home for your child. I have three children of my own, one in college, one in elementary school and a toddler, so I am very experienced with all age groups. We follow a routine that includes preschool age appropriate activities in the morning. I enjoy reading time at the library and highly encourage supervised outdoor play in my fenced backyard. I lead an active healthy lifestyle. That includes a balanced diet for the children I care for. I am a mature, patient caregiver.
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