Todays child care CO

We recognize that there are good reasons to make changes in early childhood education and care (ECEC) in Ontario.  But we believe that these must be based on the best available evidence about what is of most benefit to children and families; we argue that these proposed changes are not. Additionally, we suggest that changes in ECEC in Ontario will continue to have negative effects if they continue to be “piecemeal”.
Some of the child rearing advice was unexpected: p. 203 "no parents can really play with their children" because they have "too much responsibility, too many disappointments, too much school learning to play" and "Don't play with your children, just do your stuff-laundry, cooking, gardening, mowing the lawn, bird watching." Perhaps the authors began writing the section to stress the importance of letting children have creative play rather than structuring all playtime with activities and parental narration, but they composed a message of 'do your chores and leave your child to do his own thing.' Again, there were no references in this brief section, though there are plenty of sources the authors could have drawn from if they had done some research.
- An apparent misunderstanding about baby-led weaning. The book says that baby-led weaning is to be resisted and that baby's parents should be squarely in charge of what baby eats from the beginning. I did a combination of purees and baby-led weaning with both my children, and I was always squarely in charge of what they ate and what they were offered. Part of my role as a mother is to prepare nourishing foods for my children. Whether they pick at it and hand-feed themselves or whether I offered it mushed up on a spoon is irrelevant. The book fails to recognise that a child can only choose food from that which they have been offered or is available. If only nourishing food is offered and available, then that is what the child will choose.
You ensure that your little one sees the doctor for general health care. Dental care is an important part of taking care of a child’s health, too. As a good parent you know that taking care of one’s teeth is a great habit to teach young people from a very early age. Everyone loves to show off a brilliant smile, at every age. And when kids take care of their pearly whites from a young age, they’ll maintain their beautiful smile for years to come.
We provide educational daycare in the greater Parker, CO area that focuses on days filled with learning and fun, the key ingredients of our Life Essentials® educational philosophy. The smiles you’ll see on our children’s faces as they learn, share family style meals with other children, and grow socially will delight you. The words from our children’s parents about our program, safety and facility will impress you.
An otoacoustic emission (OAE) is a sound which is generated from within the inner ear. Having been predicted by Thomas Gold in 1948, its existence was first demonstrated experimentally by David Kemp in 1978[1] and otoacoustic emissions have since been shown to arise through a number of different cellular and mechanical causes within the inner ear.[2][3] Studies have shown that OAEs disappear after the inner ear has been damaged, so OAEs are often used in the laboratory and the clinic as a measure of inner ear health.
“I put both of my kids in TLE when it opened and they have been doing great. My son is in first grade now and he was ahead of the game all through kindergarten and is continuing to do well. My daughter has been learning a lot while being there as well. It is not uncommon for her to see words here and there that she recognizes or doing some addition or subtraction without her even realizing it. ”
Some of the child rearing advice was unexpected: p. 203 "no parents can really play with their children" because they have "too much responsibility, too many disappointments, too much school learning to play" and "Don't play with your children, just do your stuff-laundry, cooking, gardening, mowing the lawn, bird watching." Perhaps the authors began writing the section to stress the importance of letting children have creative play rather than structuring all playtime with activities and parental narration, but they composed a message of 'do your chores and leave your child to do his own thing.' Again, there were no references in this brief section, though there are plenty of sources the authors could have drawn from if they had done some research.
- Promotion of the time-out technique for dealing with inappropriate behaviour (p173). I've worked with enough children in my career and read enough literature on child behaviour and development to know that time-out is an ineffective, overused and misunderstood tool that adults resort to when they have no clue otherwise how to deal with their child's actions (thank you Super Nanny). In many cases it's the parents who need time out from the situation to cool down and gather their composure. I'm not about to tell anyone how to parent, but I will say that when a child is sent to time-out to 'think about their behaviour', you can be guaranteed they're thinking of anything BUT that.
OAEs are considered to be related to the amplification function of the cochlea. In the absence of external stimulation, the activity of the cochlear amplifier increases, leading to the production of sound. Several lines of evidence suggest that, in mammals, outer hair cells are the elements that enhance cochlear sensitivity and frequency selectivity and hence act as the energy sources for amplification. One theory is that they act to increase the discriminability of signal variations in continuous noise by lowering the masking effect of its cochlear amplification.[4]
I enjoyed reading Nourishing Traditions (NT) and have incorporated some of the information from that book into my family's diet. It also prompted me to delve into some areas of nutrition research that I hadn't read before NT. I expected this book to take a similar approach to child care (i.e. present qualitative and quantitative research, give an overview of historical trends, and present ideas from various cultures). I had high hopes for this book, since Sally Fallon was once again listed as an author, but after reading this book perhaps I should search for more from Mary Enig (the co-author of NT, but not on this book).
I am a stay at home mom of three children ages 3-9. I live near Hampden and Tower in Aurora. I am able to offer you and your spouse the best date night ever. I will watch your kids in my house and give your children their own bed to sleep in. So this way you can actually have time with each other without curfew. I am available to watch your family during the week. We go on adventures, it could be the zoo, skating, painting, who knows. I do all this out of my home. I provide breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks. I have car seats for everyone. I look forward to meeting you and your family.
Thus, we propose that your government needs to withdraw proposed changes to age ranges, ratios and group sizes. Instead we recommend that the government develop a well-considered road map that begins with a clear vision, goals/objectives, targets and timetables, with regulatory changes as one part of this plan. This would have a better chance for successful policy change. We also call on Ontario to play a positive leadership role with the new federal Liberal government and other provinces/territories in developing the high quality universal integrated ECEC system that so many have been seeking for so long.    
In high school I was involved with sports (softball, basketball, track) was FFA vice president, and a member of the National Honor Society. After high school I received an athletic scholarship to play softball. While in college I started a physical education program at a local Lutheran Church School. The people and the children became family to me and I was offered a part time teaching assistant job working with the kindergarten class. During the summers of college I spent my time coaching softball to young girls. Over my four years of coaching we won four state titles, four regional titles, three Nationals appearances as well as an invitation to the Babe Ruth Little League World Series.
×