Todays child care CO

- Promotion of the time-out technique for dealing with inappropriate behaviour (p173). I've worked with enough children in my career and read enough literature on child behaviour and development to know that time-out is an ineffective, overused and misunderstood tool that adults resort to when they have no clue otherwise how to deal with their child's actions (thank you Super Nanny). In many cases it's the parents who need time out from the situation to cool down and gather their composure. I'm not about to tell anyone how to parent, but I will say that when a child is sent to time-out to 'think about their behaviour', you can be guaranteed they're thinking of anything BUT that.
I have raised four children and was blessed to be a stay-at-home mother, home-schooled all four through 8th grade. My youngest is in high school and the other three attend college and/or have professional jobs. I thoroughly enjoy working with children in developing cognitive skills and/or loving precious babies. I took care of my parents until their death four years ago. My husband and I have been happily married for 26 years, attend church weekly, and live in Saddle Rock Ranches. I have extra time during the day and would love to help parents with their children, aging parents and pets! If you need a sitter, one time or regularly, while you shop, work out, run errands, etc., please give me a call!
- An apparent misunderstanding about baby-led weaning. The book says that baby-led weaning is to be resisted and that baby's parents should be squarely in charge of what baby eats from the beginning. I did a combination of purees and baby-led weaning with both my children, and I was always squarely in charge of what they ate and what they were offered. Part of my role as a mother is to prepare nourishing foods for my children. Whether they pick at it and hand-feed themselves or whether I offered it mushed up on a spoon is irrelevant. The book fails to recognise that a child can only choose food from that which they have been offered or is available. If only nourishing food is offered and available, then that is what the child will choose.
OAEs are considered to be related to the amplification function of the cochlea. In the absence of external stimulation, the activity of the cochlear amplifier increases, leading to the production of sound. Several lines of evidence suggest that, in mammals, outer hair cells are the elements that enhance cochlear sensitivity and frequency selectivity and hence act as the energy sources for amplification. One theory is that they act to increase the discriminability of signal variations in continuous noise by lowering the masking effect of its cochlear amplification.[4]
Otoacoustic emissions are clinically important because they are the basis of a simple, non-invasive test for hearing defects in newborn babies and in children who are too young to cooperate in conventional hearing tests. Many western countries now have national programmes for the universal hearing screening of newborn babies. Periodic early childhood hearing screenings program are also utilizing OAE technology. One excellent example has been demonstrated by the Early Childhood Hearing Outreach Initiative at the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management (NCHAM) at Utah State University, which has helped hundreds of Early Head Start programs across the United States implement OAE screening and follow-up practices in those early childhood educational settings.[8][9][10] The primary screening tool is a test for the presence of a click-evoked OAE. Otoacoustic emissions also assist in differential diagnosis of cochlear and higher level hearing losses (e.g., auditory neuropathy).
There are myriad sections without references. At other times the authors reference secondary sources (in discussing toilet training they note that "Pediatrician Lindy Woodard believes that a child can and should be trained by thirty months; in her professional experience, children who are trained at an older age have more problems learning to use the toilet." p. 168). Often the subject of a section would lack focus and context, such as p. 209 where the authors talk about "soul disorders" in reference to mental health. One assumes they are referencing the work of someone else, but it isn't cited or put into context. This leaves the reader to wonder why the authors would consider if "wisdom teeth extraction impacts our souls."
Some of the child rearing advice was unexpected: p. 203 "no parents can really play with their children" because they have "too much responsibility, too many disappointments, too much school learning to play" and "Don't play with your children, just do your stuff-laundry, cooking, gardening, mowing the lawn, bird watching." Perhaps the authors began writing the section to stress the importance of letting children have creative play rather than structuring all playtime with activities and parental narration, but they composed a message of 'do your chores and leave your child to do his own thing.' Again, there were no references in this brief section, though there are plenty of sources the authors could have drawn from if they had done some research.

There is a lot to like about The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care by Sally Fallon Morrell and Thomas S Cowan. Some of it is exceptionally well-researched (other things I thought were a little sketchy or questionable, see further below). I could never list all the awesome things the book discusses, but some of the highlights for me include:

Sheila was always very warm with my son, and very happy to see us everyday! Her house is beautiful, clean, and safe. (Her husband goes on hunting trips - it's okay, but I wished I knew that before I enrolled my son there -, but I guess the guns are locked away.) I felt good about leaving my son there. He never complained. If you want a place where your kid can play with other kids and interact with a kind adult, I highly recommend Angel Camp!
Dear Premier Wynne, even if one didn’t have children and had no idea how our child care system works, by just looking at the proposed changes one would concluded that a 12 month old is at a completely different developmental level than a almost 2 years old. And having 2 year old learning with children ready for Kindergarten doesn’t make any sense. Please do the right thing here to our already pathetic underfunded child care system and withdraw these changes.
At Bradford Early Education, we believe that children are on their own developmental journey and that children should be challenged based on their individual interests, needs and capabilities. We endeavor to prepare our children for their academic careers by using scientific principles and empirically supported methods. As a Bradford Early Education school, we teach from a unique and independent curriculum.
The Aurora Public Schools is committed to the policy that all persons shall have equal access to its programs, facilities, and employment and does not discriminate on the basis of race, age, color, creed, national origin, sexual orientation (which includes transgender), conditions related to pregnancy or childbirth, disability, religion, ancestry, sex or need for special education services, or genetic information for employment and provides equal access to the Boy Scouts and other designated youth groups. Career and technical education opportunities will be offered without regard to these protected classes. In adhering to this policy, the Aurora Public Schools abides by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act and Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
- An apparent misunderstanding about baby-led weaning. The book says that baby-led weaning is to be resisted and that baby's parents should be squarely in charge of what baby eats from the beginning. I did a combination of purees and baby-led weaning with both my children, and I was always squarely in charge of what they ate and what they were offered. Part of my role as a mother is to prepare nourishing foods for my children. Whether they pick at it and hand-feed themselves or whether I offered it mushed up on a spoon is irrelevant. The book fails to recognise that a child can only choose food from that which they have been offered or is available. If only nourishing food is offered and available, then that is what the child will choose.
There is a lot to like about The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care by Sally Fallon Morrell and Thomas S Cowan. Some of it is exceptionally well-researched (other things I thought were a little sketchy or questionable, see further below). I could never list all the awesome things the book discusses, but some of the highlights for me include:

Your government contends that these changes are necessary because they will “increase access”. To the contrary, analyses by public entities and community service providers show that “new” infant rooms with a younger, narrower age range at a very high fee will close and that there will be severe financial and practical effects that affect service viability across age groups.
“I put both of my kids in TLE when it opened and they have been doing great. My son is in first grade now and he was ahead of the game all through kindergarten and is continuing to do well. My daughter has been learning a lot while being there as well. It is not uncommon for her to see words here and there that she recognizes or doing some addition or subtraction without her even realizing it. ”
My name is Kara Downing but now days I go by Miss Kara. I grew up in south eastern Colorado on a 2500 acre farm with my brother and sister. I was the youngest sibling and always wanted a younger brother or sister. As a young child I was always helping take care of my younger cousins and I loved babysitting. My grandma was an elementary teacher and I remember going to help in her classroom and the idea of teaching seemed like so much fun. I believe all of these factors helped my find my passion with working with children.
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