Todays child care CO

Jump up ^ Marshall, Lynne; Miller, Judi A. Lapsley; Heller, Laurie M.; Wolgemuth, Keith S.; Hughes, Linda M.; Smith, Shelley D.; Kopke, Richard D. (2009-02-01). "Detecting incipient inner-ear damage from impulse noise with otoacoustic emissions". The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 125 (2): 995–1013. Bibcode:2009ASAJ..125..995M. doi:10.1121/1.3050304. ISSN 0001-4966.
Although I anticipated the publishing of this book with excitement, I cannot recommend "The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care". Thank you for taking the time to read this review, and thank you for not clicking "unhelpful" simply because you disagree with my view. NT is a groundbreaking book, and I sincerely hope this book does not tarnish its reputation.
It is hard to argue that a two year old with the proposed 1:8 adult: child ratio in a group of 24 is in a “quality” or even a safe environment.  While we are pleased with the proposal to increase the number of Registered Early Childhood Educators, research suggests that an increase in trained staff is not a trade-off for decent ratios and group sizes.  Additionally, the already-stretched, underpaid, 97% female child care workforce cannot continue to pick up the slack for massive gaps in public financing.  

To me, this is the most important resource to have for raising healthy children. I am pregnant with my 2nd child and follow the extremely nutrient dense pregnancy diet from this book. I’ve also followed the food introduction schedule for my first born (3 yo now) to ensure he grows up loving and eating REAL FOOD- not crap food laced with sugar and chemicals like cereal, processed/boxed/bagged “foods”, juice, waffles, artificially colored anything, pizza, etc which gives children zero vitamins and nutrition. My son eats and loves broccoli, salmon, chicken, eggs, fruits, beans, nuts, cod liver oil, avocados, coconut oil, bone broth soups...all because of what I’ve read in this wonderful book. I truly believe because he has grown up on these nutrient dense foods and healthy fats like CLO, coconut oil and real butter, his memory is astounding (brains REQUIRE fats to function optimally!). I am constantly referring to it not just for diet, but for alternative cures for childhood sickness, how to make your home as healthy as possible, baby and child care, vaccines, supplementation, child milestones, recipes, to name a few. If you want to have a truly healthy pregnancy and child, this is the book to follow.
I enjoyed reading Nourishing Traditions (NT) and have incorporated some of the information from that book into my family's diet. It also prompted me to delve into some areas of nutrition research that I hadn't read before NT. I expected this book to take a similar approach to child care (i.e. present qualitative and quantitative research, give an overview of historical trends, and present ideas from various cultures). I had high hopes for this book, since Sally Fallon was once again listed as an author, but after reading this book perhaps I should search for more from Mary Enig (the co-author of NT, but not on this book).
Some of the child rearing advice was unexpected: p. 203 "no parents can really play with their children" because they have "too much responsibility, too many disappointments, too much school learning to play" and "Don't play with your children, just do your stuff-laundry, cooking, gardening, mowing the lawn, bird watching." Perhaps the authors began writing the section to stress the importance of letting children have creative play rather than structuring all playtime with activities and parental narration, but they composed a message of 'do your chores and leave your child to do his own thing.' Again, there were no references in this brief section, though there are plenty of sources the authors could have drawn from if they had done some research.
There are myriad sections without references. At other times the authors reference secondary sources (in discussing toilet training they note that "Pediatrician Lindy Woodard believes that a child can and should be trained by thirty months; in her professional experience, children who are trained at an older age have more problems learning to use the toilet." p. 168). Often the subject of a section would lack focus and context, such as p. 209 where the authors talk about "soul disorders" in reference to mental health. One assumes they are referencing the work of someone else, but it isn't cited or put into context. This leaves the reader to wonder why the authors would consider if "wisdom teeth extraction impacts our souls."

We provide educational daycare in the greater Parker, CO area that focuses on days filled with learning and fun, the key ingredients of our Life Essentials® educational philosophy. The smiles you’ll see on our children’s faces as they learn, share family style meals with other children, and grow socially will delight you. The words from our children’s parents about our program, safety and facility will impress you.
All personal items must be labeled. All staff are CPR/AED/1st Aid certified and have childcare experience. Children will be released only to those individuals who initially dropped them off. Individuals must be 18 years old to pick up a child from the nursery. You are welcome to bring a small snack, however we do not allow any peanut products of any kind. No snacks are provided by staff. Please no sick children
Hello my name is Nicole and together with my husband we run a very small in home day care. We have a unique program where our babies really grow up and learn together. We start with all new born babies then as they grow so does our daycare. We started as an infant nursery last year, then converted into a toddler nursery and now we are doing pre-school followed by a full preschool program next year. Then we will start over again!
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