Todays child care CO

I have loved working with kids since I was 12, shadowing a family friend in her in-home daycare, until I began working there at 14. I grew up in that environment starting at age 9 however, so I was always familiar to the process, if not involved. She took children from 3 mo to 6 yrs, and from there I worked at a summer camp with kids age 5 to 11, where I also coordinated birthday parties based on the parents' requests. Meanwhile working with various clients throughout the years. I recently worked in a center as an Infant Supervisor, but I prefer 1 on 1 with families so I went back to nannying! I've just had a little one of my own at the end of July, and took a little time off for baby, but I'll be back to work at the end of October. When I am ready I would prefer a full time family that is okay with him coming along with me. If this will work for you, please get back to me! I will look forward to meeting you in the future!
In conjunction with audiometric testing, OAE testing can be completed to determine changes in the responses. Studies have found that exposure to noise can cause a decline in OAE responses. In a study, industrial workers who were exposed to 84.5 dBA of noise were compared to workers who were exposed to 53.2 dBA of noise by considering hearing thresholds and OAEs before and after 5 days of work. This study revealed that hearing thresholds and OAE results were significantly lower among the workers who were exposed to higher levels of noise.[12]

- Promotion of the time-out technique for dealing with inappropriate behaviour (p173). I've worked with enough children in my career and read enough literature on child behaviour and development to know that time-out is an ineffective, overused and misunderstood tool that adults resort to when they have no clue otherwise how to deal with their child's actions (thank you Super Nanny). In many cases it's the parents who need time out from the situation to cool down and gather their composure. I'm not about to tell anyone how to parent, but I will say that when a child is sent to time-out to 'think about their behaviour', you can be guaranteed they're thinking of anything BUT that.
We recognize that there are good reasons to make changes in early childhood education and care (ECEC) in Ontario.  But we believe that these must be based on the best available evidence about what is of most benefit to children and families; we argue that these proposed changes are not. Additionally, we suggest that changes in ECEC in Ontario will continue to have negative effects if they continue to be “piecemeal”.

We recognize that there are good reasons to make changes in early childhood education and care (ECEC) in Ontario.  But we believe that these must be based on the best available evidence about what is of most benefit to children and families; we argue that these proposed changes are not. Additionally, we suggest that changes in ECEC in Ontario will continue to have negative effects if they continue to be “piecemeal”.
Some of the child rearing advice was unexpected: p. 203 "no parents can really play with their children" because they have "too much responsibility, too many disappointments, too much school learning to play" and "Don't play with your children, just do your stuff-laundry, cooking, gardening, mowing the lawn, bird watching." Perhaps the authors began writing the section to stress the importance of letting children have creative play rather than structuring all playtime with activities and parental narration, but they composed a message of 'do your chores and leave your child to do his own thing.' Again, there were no references in this brief section, though there are plenty of sources the authors could have drawn from if they had done some research.
- A suggestion that it is not necessary to consume large amounts of water before and during pregnancy (p35). Apparently, the best way to hydrate your body is to 'consume plenty of healthy fats, because fats provide the most energy on the cellular level - much more than carbohydrates and proteins, and the by product of this energy is water'. I don't know enough about this matter to comment further at this stage, but I find it strange that drinking water would be discouraged.
The benefits of high quality early learning experiences for children appeal to both early childhood programs and families. By participating in the Qualistar Rating™ programs receive a detailed Quality Performance Profile© (QPP) that includes strengths and areas for improvement specific to their program and classrooms. Families benefit by accessing the program’s Quality Rating Report and by gaining an understanding of the components contributing to quality early learning experiences. This helps parents make more informed choices on the type of care they would like for their child.
In 2009, Stephen Beeby of The University of Southampton led research into utilizing otoacoustic emissions for biometric identification. Devices equipped with a microphone could detect these subsonic emissions and potentially identify an individual, thereby providing access to the device, without the need of a traditional password.[15] It is speculated, however, that colds, medication, trimming one's ear hair, or recording and playing back a signal to the microphone could subvert the identification process.[16]
- Promotion of the time-out technique for dealing with inappropriate behaviour (p173). I've worked with enough children in my career and read enough literature on child behaviour and development to know that time-out is an ineffective, overused and misunderstood tool that adults resort to when they have no clue otherwise how to deal with their child's actions (thank you Super Nanny). In many cases it's the parents who need time out from the situation to cool down and gather their composure. I'm not about to tell anyone how to parent, but I will say that when a child is sent to time-out to 'think about their behaviour', you can be guaranteed they're thinking of anything BUT that.
Disclaimer: We at ChildcareCenter strive daily to keep our listings accurate and up-to-date, and to provide top-level, practical information that you can use and trust. However, ChildcareCenter.us does not endorse or recommend any of the childcare providers listed on its site, cannot be held responsible or liable in any way for your dealings with them, and does not guarantee the accuracy of listings on its site. We provide this site as a directory to assist you in locating childcare providers in your area. We do not own or operate any child care facility, and make no representation of any of the listings contained within ChildcareCenter.us.
×