Todays child care CO

“I put both of my kids in TLE when it opened and they have been doing great. My son is in first grade now and he was ahead of the game all through kindergarten and is continuing to do well. My daughter has been learning a lot while being there as well. It is not uncommon for her to see words here and there that she recognizes or doing some addition or subtraction without her even realizing it. ”
Some of the child rearing advice was unexpected: p. 203 "no parents can really play with their children" because they have "too much responsibility, too many disappointments, too much school learning to play" and "Don't play with your children, just do your stuff-laundry, cooking, gardening, mowing the lawn, bird watching." Perhaps the authors began writing the section to stress the importance of letting children have creative play rather than structuring all playtime with activities and parental narration, but they composed a message of 'do your chores and leave your child to do his own thing.' Again, there were no references in this brief section, though there are plenty of sources the authors could have drawn from if they had done some research.
When I graduate in June 2016, I will officially be an ECE. Throughout my studies, discussions of low recognition of ECEs, no National Framework, low wages for ECEs, etc have been hot topics. Learning that there is such a lack of help for ECEs is alarming, especially for someone fresh out of school in hopes of having this as a career, a way to provide for a family. Looking into a National Framework in the 2017-2018 budget is not helping families, ECEs, etc who need help NOW. Now is the time to make a difference for the future. Doing something in the future doesn’t help with the problems we face now.
- An apparent misunderstanding about baby-led weaning. The book says that baby-led weaning is to be resisted and that baby's parents should be squarely in charge of what baby eats from the beginning. I did a combination of purees and baby-led weaning with both my children, and I was always squarely in charge of what they ate and what they were offered. Part of my role as a mother is to prepare nourishing foods for my children. Whether they pick at it and hand-feed themselves or whether I offered it mushed up on a spoon is irrelevant. The book fails to recognise that a child can only choose food from that which they have been offered or is available. If only nourishing food is offered and available, then that is what the child will choose.
The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby & Child Care makes the principles of traditional nutrition available to modern parents. The book provides holistic advice for pregnancy and newborn interventions, vaccinations, breastfeeding and child development, as well as a compendium of natural treatments for childhood illnesses, from autism to whooping cough. The work of Rudulf Steiner supports the book's emphasis on the child's spiritual requirement for imaginative play.
There are myriad sections without references. At other times the authors reference secondary sources (in discussing toilet training they note that "Pediatrician Lindy Woodard believes that a child can and should be trained by thirty months; in her professional experience, children who are trained at an older age have more problems learning to use the toilet." p. 168). Often the subject of a section would lack focus and context, such as p. 209 where the authors talk about "soul disorders" in reference to mental health. One assumes they are referencing the work of someone else, but it isn't cited or put into context. This leaves the reader to wonder why the authors would consider if "wisdom teeth extraction impacts our souls."
Otoacoustic emissions are clinically important because they are the basis of a simple, non-invasive test for hearing defects in newborn babies and in children who are too young to cooperate in conventional hearing tests. Many western countries now have national programmes for the universal hearing screening of newborn babies. Periodic early childhood hearing screenings program are also utilizing OAE technology. One excellent example has been demonstrated by the Early Childhood Hearing Outreach Initiative at the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management (NCHAM) at Utah State University, which has helped hundreds of Early Head Start programs across the United States implement OAE screening and follow-up practices in those early childhood educational settings.[8][9][10] The primary screening tool is a test for the presence of a click-evoked OAE. Otoacoustic emissions also assist in differential diagnosis of cochlear and higher level hearing losses (e.g., auditory neuropathy).
All personal items must be labeled. All staff are CPR/AED/1st Aid certified and have childcare experience. Children will be released only to those individuals who initially dropped them off. Individuals must be 18 years old to pick up a child from the nursery. You are welcome to bring a small snack, however we do not allow any peanut products of any kind. No snacks are provided by staff. Please no sick children

I am Melonie & LOVE children of all ages. Each phase has something exciting & wonderful to offer. Stay-at-home mom for 20 years, I raised 4 amazing sons. Volunteered in school, church & cub scouts, many leadership positions, taught parenting classes. Arts & Crafts Junior High School Teacher, worked in mental health. Taking care of your children & making a positive impact in their lives would be very rewarding for me. My attributes are reliable, dependable, honest, hardworking, loving, gentle, kind, nurturing, passionate, organized & multi-tasking. Helping children to become self-confident, loving & caring people, as they learn how they fit in this big world, is very exciting for me. I look forward to sharing what I have to offer to you as a nanny. I am considered to be a Professional Nanny Manager as I plan meals, grocery shop, prepare and serve meals, do laundry and ironing as well as care for the children. Basically I manage the household to help keep it running smoothly.
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