Todays child care CO

I am a stay-at-home mom and have a 7-year-old son. I have been caring for other children for 9 years now. I am very flexible with scheduling, I enjoy watching other children, along with my son, so he can have some interaction with others, which is very important to me. I can come to your home, or your child(ren) could come to mine, whichever you're more comfortable with. I do not smoke and I have my own transportation, also am just fine with pets! I have no specific rate, it just depends on what works for the parents of the child(ren), I am caring for. It's usually between $9 to $12/hour.
- Promotion of the time-out technique for dealing with inappropriate behaviour (p173). I've worked with enough children in my career and read enough literature on child behaviour and development to know that time-out is an ineffective, overused and misunderstood tool that adults resort to when they have no clue otherwise how to deal with their child's actions (thank you Super Nanny). In many cases it's the parents who need time out from the situation to cool down and gather their composure. I'm not about to tell anyone how to parent, but I will say that when a child is sent to time-out to 'think about their behaviour', you can be guaranteed they're thinking of anything BUT that.
There are myriad sections without references. At other times the authors reference secondary sources (in discussing toilet training they note that "Pediatrician Lindy Woodard believes that a child can and should be trained by thirty months; in her professional experience, children who are trained at an older age have more problems learning to use the toilet." p. 168). Often the subject of a section would lack focus and context, such as p. 209 where the authors talk about "soul disorders" in reference to mental health. One assumes they are referencing the work of someone else, but it isn't cited or put into context. This leaves the reader to wonder why the authors would consider if "wisdom teeth extraction impacts our souls."
In 2009, Stephen Beeby of The University of Southampton led research into utilizing otoacoustic emissions for biometric identification. Devices equipped with a microphone could detect these subsonic emissions and potentially identify an individual, thereby providing access to the device, without the need of a traditional password.[15] It is speculated, however, that colds, medication, trimming one's ear hair, or recording and playing back a signal to the microphone could subvert the identification process.[16]
- A suggestion that it is not necessary to consume large amounts of water before and during pregnancy (p35). Apparently, the best way to hydrate your body is to 'consume plenty of healthy fats, because fats provide the most energy on the cellular level - much more than carbohydrates and proteins, and the by product of this energy is water'. I don't know enough about this matter to comment further at this stage, but I find it strange that drinking water would be discouraged.

It has been found that distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE’s) have provided the most information for detecting mild hearing loss in high frequencies when compared to transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE).[13] This is an indication that DPOAE’s can help with detecting an early onset of noise-induced hearing loss. A study measuring audiometric thresholds and DPOAEs among individuals in the military showed that there was a decrease in DPOAEs after noise exposure, but did not show a shift in audiometric threshold. This supports OAEs as predicting early signs of noise damage.[14]
- "Attachment parentings can interfere with a child's need to learn about the world on his own, and his gradual emergence into his sense of independent self" (p156). Clearly, the authors have confused attachment parenting with helicopter parenting. One of the greatest outcomes of attachment parenting is confident and secure children who are not only independent, but highly inter-dependent.
Hello my name is Nicole and together with my husband we run a very small in home day care. We have a unique program where our babies really grow up and learn together. We start with all new born babies then as they grow so does our daycare. We started as an infant nursery last year, then converted into a toddler nursery and now we are doing pre-school followed by a full preschool program next year. Then we will start over again!
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