Todays child care CO

The relationships between otoacoustic emissions and tinnitus have been explored. Several studies suggest that in about 6% to 12% of normal-hearing persons with tinnitus and SOAEs, the SOAEs are at least partly responsible for the tinnitus.[11] Studies have found that some subjects with tinnitus display oscillating or ringing EOAEs, and in these cases, it is hypothesized that the oscillating EOAEs and tinnitus are related to a common underlying pathology rather than the emissions being the source of the tinnitus.[11]
OAEs are considered to be related to the amplification function of the cochlea. In the absence of external stimulation, the activity of the cochlear amplifier increases, leading to the production of sound. Several lines of evidence suggest that, in mammals, outer hair cells are the elements that enhance cochlear sensitivity and frequency selectivity and hence act as the energy sources for amplification. One theory is that they act to increase the discriminability of signal variations in continuous noise by lowering the masking effect of its cochlear amplification.[4]
We recognize that there are good reasons to make changes in early childhood education and care (ECEC) in Ontario.  But we believe that these must be based on the best available evidence about what is of most benefit to children and families; we argue that these proposed changes are not. Additionally, we suggest that changes in ECEC in Ontario will continue to have negative effects if they continue to be “piecemeal”.

There are myriad sections without references. At other times the authors reference secondary sources (in discussing toilet training they note that "Pediatrician Lindy Woodard believes that a child can and should be trained by thirty months; in her professional experience, children who are trained at an older age have more problems learning to use the toilet." p. 168). Often the subject of a section would lack focus and context, such as p. 209 where the authors talk about "soul disorders" in reference to mental health. One assumes they are referencing the work of someone else, but it isn't cited or put into context. This leaves the reader to wonder why the authors would consider if "wisdom teeth extraction impacts our souls."

It is hard to argue that a two year old with the proposed 1:8 adult: child ratio in a group of 24 is in a “quality” or even a safe environment.  While we are pleased with the proposal to increase the number of Registered Early Childhood Educators, research suggests that an increase in trained staff is not a trade-off for decent ratios and group sizes.  Additionally, the already-stretched, underpaid, 97% female child care workforce cannot continue to pick up the slack for massive gaps in public financing.  
Our dedicated teachers encourage students to be active and creative explorers, as well as independent, self-confident learners. In fact, at Cadence Academy Preschool, Smoky Hill, every student is treated as an individual and able to progress at his or her natural ability while still reaching desired age-level goals. In addition to core curriculum offered for preschool and Pre-Kindergarten children, we provide before and after care for school-age children.
Perhaps the first sign that this book would be a let down were the typos throughout the pages (such as "hunbands" for husbands p 211, "sores" for scores p 104). The carelessness of the authors was reflected in the poor quality of the content and its presentation. This book lacked a coherent voice, and others have noted the contradictory statements found throughout its pages.

There is a lot to like about The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care by Sally Fallon Morrell and Thomas S Cowan. Some of it is exceptionally well-researched (other things I thought were a little sketchy or questionable, see further below). I could never list all the awesome things the book discusses, but some of the highlights for me include:


I was lucky enough to come in contact with Sheila after going through numerous babysitters/child care providers who either my kids did not like or the babysitter/child care provider could no longer care for my children. After bouncing around from provider to provider, I was relieved to find Angel Camp where my girls are thrilled about spending each day there. They are very well taken care of, happy, and I have no worries about my children during the day. She keeps in good contact with me so I always know the status of my children and how their day is going. It means the world to me knowing my children are in good hands. 
I must admit I am surprised that with the concept of Nourishing Traditions being about adopting traditional methods of preparing foods as observed in ultra-healthy non-western people groups, I expected the book on baby and child care to promote more traditional and indigenous ways of nurturing (not just nourishing) little ones, such as babywearing and co-sleeping. I guess we always have The Continuum Concept by Jean Liedloff for that!

My licensed home childcare will incorporate the experience and knowledge I have gained while working 13 years as a preschool teacher most of which was at a NAEYC accredited 4 Star Qualistar rated program. I am CPR/First Aid certified. I have a fenced in backyard and there is a park nearby. I absolutely LOVE spending my days watching children learn, grow, and experience the world around them, to me there is no other job as rewarding!
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