Todays child care CO

We have had our two children (and soon to be one more) enrolled at Orchard Valley for the last 2 years and we have been very pleased. The teachers are excellent and their curriculum is top notch! Our children absolutely love to go to school. Occasionally even on the weekends they will ask, "Can we go to school today?" Each and every day is new and exciting. They do crafts, enjoy outdoor play and they are always learning something new. We have had our children at another top notch daycare center previous to this one and we left that one to come to Orchard Valley for the education that they provide. There are other more expensive programs out there. But Orchard Valley is the top for the quality of care, education, and guidance that you receive for your money. All instructors are background checked and CPR certified. If there is a problem it gets resolved immediately. I also like their no tolerance for biting as well as their discipline policies. They really work with you and your family to raise your child together as a team. Also, they do a fantastic job with potty training making it a painless process for all. This is an A++++++++++++++ organization and we have recommended it many times to our friends for their childcare needs.
Some of the child rearing advice was unexpected: p. 203 "no parents can really play with their children" because they have "too much responsibility, too many disappointments, too much school learning to play" and "Don't play with your children, just do your stuff-laundry, cooking, gardening, mowing the lawn, bird watching." Perhaps the authors began writing the section to stress the importance of letting children have creative play rather than structuring all playtime with activities and parental narration, but they composed a message of 'do your chores and leave your child to do his own thing.' Again, there were no references in this brief section, though there are plenty of sources the authors could have drawn from if they had done some research.
Jump up ^ Marshall, Lynne; Miller, Judi A. Lapsley; Heller, Laurie M.; Wolgemuth, Keith S.; Hughes, Linda M.; Smith, Shelley D.; Kopke, Richard D. (2009-02-01). "Detecting incipient inner-ear damage from impulse noise with otoacoustic emissions". The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 125 (2): 995–1013. Bibcode:2009ASAJ..125..995M. doi:10.1121/1.3050304. ISSN 0001-4966.
The benefits of high quality early learning experiences for children appeal to both early childhood programs and families. By participating in the Qualistar Rating™ programs receive a detailed Quality Performance Profile© (QPP) that includes strengths and areas for improvement specific to their program and classrooms. Families benefit by accessing the program’s Quality Rating Report and by gaining an understanding of the components contributing to quality early learning experiences. This helps parents make more informed choices on the type of care they would like for their child.
Perhaps the first sign that this book would be a let down were the typos throughout the pages (such as "hunbands" for husbands p 211, "sores" for scores p 104). The carelessness of the authors was reflected in the poor quality of the content and its presentation. This book lacked a coherent voice, and others have noted the contradictory statements found throughout its pages.
Thank you for your interest in Children's Playland in Aurora, CO! We are conveniently located at 1555 South Havana Street. We offer a premier learning environment for children ages six weeks to five years and holiday and summer care up to age 12. Children's Playland is not just a daycare facility but also a complete child development center with a dynamic and fun environment that is committed to quality, developmentallycare and education of your child. We specialize in providing high quality l
Jump up ^ Marshall, Lynne; Miller, Judi A. Lapsley; Heller, Laurie M.; Wolgemuth, Keith S.; Hughes, Linda M.; Smith, Shelley D.; Kopke, Richard D. (2009-02-01). "Detecting incipient inner-ear damage from impulse noise with otoacoustic emissions". The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 125 (2): 995–1013. Bibcode:2009ASAJ..125..995M. doi:10.1121/1.3050304. ISSN 0001-4966.
There is a lot to like about The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care by Sally Fallon Morrell and Thomas S Cowan. Some of it is exceptionally well-researched (other things I thought were a little sketchy or questionable, see further below). I could never list all the awesome things the book discusses, but some of the highlights for me include:
An otoacoustic emission (OAE) is a sound which is generated from within the inner ear. Having been predicted by Thomas Gold in 1948, its existence was first demonstrated experimentally by David Kemp in 1978[1] and otoacoustic emissions have since been shown to arise through a number of different cellular and mechanical causes within the inner ear.[2][3] Studies have shown that OAEs disappear after the inner ear has been damaged, so OAEs are often used in the laboratory and the clinic as a measure of inner ear health.

In 2009, Stephen Beeby of The University of Southampton led research into utilizing otoacoustic emissions for biometric identification. Devices equipped with a microphone could detect these subsonic emissions and potentially identify an individual, thereby providing access to the device, without the need of a traditional password.[15] It is speculated, however, that colds, medication, trimming one's ear hair, or recording and playing back a signal to the microphone could subvert the identification process.[16]
Thus, we propose that your government needs to withdraw proposed changes to age ranges, ratios and group sizes. Instead we recommend that the government develop a well-considered road map that begins with a clear vision, goals/objectives, targets and timetables, with regulatory changes as one part of this plan. This would have a better chance for successful policy change. We also call on Ontario to play a positive leadership role with the new federal Liberal government and other provinces/territories in developing the high quality universal integrated ECEC system that so many have been seeking for so long.    
I must admit I am surprised that with the concept of Nourishing Traditions being about adopting traditional methods of preparing foods as observed in ultra-healthy non-western people groups, I expected the book on baby and child care to promote more traditional and indigenous ways of nurturing (not just nourishing) little ones, such as babywearing and co-sleeping. I guess we always have The Continuum Concept by Jean Liedloff for that!
- Promotion of the time-out technique for dealing with inappropriate behaviour (p173). I've worked with enough children in my career and read enough literature on child behaviour and development to know that time-out is an ineffective, overused and misunderstood tool that adults resort to when they have no clue otherwise how to deal with their child's actions (thank you Super Nanny). In many cases it's the parents who need time out from the situation to cool down and gather their composure. I'm not about to tell anyone how to parent, but I will say that when a child is sent to time-out to 'think about their behaviour', you can be guaranteed they're thinking of anything BUT that.
Hello my name is Nicole and together with my husband we run a very small in home day care. We have a unique program where our babies really grow up and learn together. We start with all new born babies then as they grow so does our daycare. We started as an infant nursery last year, then converted into a toddler nursery and now we are doing pre-school followed by a full preschool program next year. Then we will start over again!
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