Todays child care CO

There are myriad sections without references. At other times the authors reference secondary sources (in discussing toilet training they note that "Pediatrician Lindy Woodard believes that a child can and should be trained by thirty months; in her professional experience, children who are trained at an older age have more problems learning to use the toilet." p. 168). Often the subject of a section would lack focus and context, such as p. 209 where the authors talk about "soul disorders" in reference to mental health. One assumes they are referencing the work of someone else, but it isn't cited or put into context. This leaves the reader to wonder why the authors would consider if "wisdom teeth extraction impacts our souls."
When I graduate in June 2016, I will officially be an ECE. Throughout my studies, discussions of low recognition of ECEs, no National Framework, low wages for ECEs, etc have been hot topics. Learning that there is such a lack of help for ECEs is alarming, especially for someone fresh out of school in hopes of having this as a career, a way to provide for a family. Looking into a National Framework in the 2017-2018 budget is not helping families, ECEs, etc who need help NOW. Now is the time to make a difference for the future. Doing something in the future doesn’t help with the problems we face now.
Some of the child rearing advice was unexpected: p. 203 "no parents can really play with their children" because they have "too much responsibility, too many disappointments, too much school learning to play" and "Don't play with your children, just do your stuff-laundry, cooking, gardening, mowing the lawn, bird watching." Perhaps the authors began writing the section to stress the importance of letting children have creative play rather than structuring all playtime with activities and parental narration, but they composed a message of 'do your chores and leave your child to do his own thing.' Again, there were no references in this brief section, though there are plenty of sources the authors could have drawn from if they had done some research.

We are here to help provide parents with peace of mind that their little one(s) are being cared for in a nurturing, warm and secure environment. Our management team, teachers and assistants follow strict guidelines, meet all state certification requirements and are First Aid and CPR certified. Consistent evaluations help maintain our center's high standard of excellence and team members are encouraged to participate in sponsored continuing education programs.
I have loved working with kids since I was 12, shadowing a family friend in her in-home daycare, until I began working there at 14. I grew up in that environment starting at age 9 however, so I was always familiar to the process, if not involved. She took children from 3 mo to 6 yrs, and from there I worked at a summer camp with kids age 5 to 11, where I also coordinated birthday parties based on the parents' requests. Meanwhile working with various clients throughout the years. I recently worked in a center as an Infant Supervisor, but I prefer 1 on 1 with families so I went back to nannying! I've just had a little one of my own at the end of July, and took a little time off for baby, but I'll be back to work at the end of October. When I am ready I would prefer a full time family that is okay with him coming along with me. If this will work for you, please get back to me! I will look forward to meeting you in the future!
I must admit I am surprised that with the concept of Nourishing Traditions being about adopting traditional methods of preparing foods as observed in ultra-healthy non-western people groups, I expected the book on baby and child care to promote more traditional and indigenous ways of nurturing (not just nourishing) little ones, such as babywearing and co-sleeping. I guess we always have The Continuum Concept by Jean Liedloff for that!
Perhaps the first sign that this book would be a let down were the typos throughout the pages (such as "hunbands" for husbands p 211, "sores" for scores p 104). The carelessness of the authors was reflected in the poor quality of the content and its presentation. This book lacked a coherent voice, and others have noted the contradictory statements found throughout its pages.
I have loved working with kids since I was 12, shadowing a family friend in her in-home daycare, until I began working there at 14. I grew up in that environment starting at age 9 however, so I was always familiar to the process, if not involved. She took children from 3 mo to 6 yrs, and from there I worked at a summer camp with kids age 5 to 11, where I also coordinated birthday parties based on the parents' requests. Meanwhile working with various clients throughout the years. I recently worked in a center as an Infant Supervisor, but I prefer 1 on 1 with families so I went back to nannying! I've just had a little one of my own at the end of July, and took a little time off for baby, but I'll be back to work at the end of October. When I am ready I would prefer a full time family that is okay with him coming along with me. If this will work for you, please get back to me! I will look forward to meeting you in the future!
Thus, we propose that your government needs to withdraw proposed changes to age ranges, ratios and group sizes. Instead we recommend that the government develop a well-considered road map that begins with a clear vision, goals/objectives, targets and timetables, with regulatory changes as one part of this plan. This would have a better chance for successful policy change. We also call on Ontario to play a positive leadership role with the new federal Liberal government and other provinces/territories in developing the high quality universal integrated ECEC system that so many have been seeking for so long.    
We are Ontario parents, educators, service providers, academics and community members. We are very concerned about some of the regulatory changes your government has proposed for child care centres. We are especially troubled by the changes to age group composition that will have the effect of reducing staff: child ratios and increasing group sizes.
Your government contends that these changes are necessary because they will “increase access”. To the contrary, analyses by public entities and community service providers show that “new” infant rooms with a younger, narrower age range at a very high fee will close and that there will be severe financial and practical effects that affect service viability across age groups.
- A suggestion that it is not necessary to consume large amounts of water before and during pregnancy (p35). Apparently, the best way to hydrate your body is to 'consume plenty of healthy fats, because fats provide the most energy on the cellular level - much more than carbohydrates and proteins, and the by product of this energy is water'. I don't know enough about this matter to comment further at this stage, but I find it strange that drinking water would be discouraged.
I must admit I am surprised that with the concept of Nourishing Traditions being about adopting traditional methods of preparing foods as observed in ultra-healthy non-western people groups, I expected the book on baby and child care to promote more traditional and indigenous ways of nurturing (not just nourishing) little ones, such as babywearing and co-sleeping. I guess we always have The Continuum Concept by Jean Liedloff for that!
There are myriad sections without references. At other times the authors reference secondary sources (in discussing toilet training they note that "Pediatrician Lindy Woodard believes that a child can and should be trained by thirty months; in her professional experience, children who are trained at an older age have more problems learning to use the toilet." p. 168). Often the subject of a section would lack focus and context, such as p. 209 where the authors talk about "soul disorders" in reference to mental health. One assumes they are referencing the work of someone else, but it isn't cited or put into context. This leaves the reader to wonder why the authors would consider if "wisdom teeth extraction impacts our souls."
Sheila was always very warm with my son, and very happy to see us everyday! Her house is beautiful, clean, and safe. (Her husband goes on hunting trips - it's okay, but I wished I knew that before I enrolled my son there -, but I guess the guns are locked away.) I felt good about leaving my son there. He never complained. If you want a place where your kid can play with other kids and interact with a kind adult, I highly recommend Angel Camp!
We are here to help provide parents with peace of mind that their little one(s) are being cared for in a nurturing, warm and secure environment. Our management team, teachers and assistants follow strict guidelines, meet all state certification requirements and are First Aid and CPR certified. Consistent evaluations help maintain our center's high standard of excellence and team members are encouraged to participate in sponsored continuing education programs.
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