Todays child care CO

- Promotion of the time-out technique for dealing with inappropriate behaviour (p173). I've worked with enough children in my career and read enough literature on child behaviour and development to know that time-out is an ineffective, overused and misunderstood tool that adults resort to when they have no clue otherwise how to deal with their child's actions (thank you Super Nanny). In many cases it's the parents who need time out from the situation to cool down and gather their composure. I'm not about to tell anyone how to parent, but I will say that when a child is sent to time-out to 'think about their behaviour', you can be guaranteed they're thinking of anything BUT that.
We are Ontario parents, educators, service providers, academics and community members. We are very concerned about some of the regulatory changes your government has proposed for child care centres. We are especially troubled by the changes to age group composition that will have the effect of reducing staff: child ratios and increasing group sizes.
The children at The Meadows spend at least 2 hours outside daily, we are the only school that writes this into our curriculum. We have many learning centers outside and our teachers take the curriculum that they develop outside to help engage the children in different environments. If the weather is too poor to go outside then we have an indoor playroom with a gigantic hand painted two level castle complete with slide, ball pit, dragon cave and fairy garden to engage their gross motor skill and help them burn off energy!
I enjoyed reading Nourishing Traditions (NT) and have incorporated some of the information from that book into my family's diet. It also prompted me to delve into some areas of nutrition research that I hadn't read before NT. I expected this book to take a similar approach to child care (i.e. present qualitative and quantitative research, give an overview of historical trends, and present ideas from various cultures). I had high hopes for this book, since Sally Fallon was once again listed as an author, but after reading this book perhaps I should search for more from Mary Enig (the co-author of NT, but not on this book).
Currently 1 OPENING - ages 16 months through school aged! A native of Denver, I have provided licensed child care in my home since 1980. I have excellent references. I serve nutritious, high quality, home cooked meals. I offer an atmosphere where learning can take place in an easy, fun environment. There are plenty of outdoor experiences. Activities include daily story time and a Christian based preschool program. In the summer, children ages 3 and up may take daily swimming lessons offered through Parks and Recreation, usually for a period of 9 weeks, Monday - Thursday. Lessons are parent paid. Thank you.
We provide educational daycare in the greater Parker, CO area that focuses on days filled with learning and fun, the key ingredients of our Life Essentials® educational philosophy. The smiles you’ll see on our children’s faces as they learn, share family style meals with other children, and grow socially will delight you. The words from our children’s parents about our program, safety and facility will impress you.
Perhaps the first sign that this book would be a let down were the typos throughout the pages (such as "hunbands" for husbands p 211, "sores" for scores p 104). The carelessness of the authors was reflected in the poor quality of the content and its presentation. This book lacked a coherent voice, and others have noted the contradictory statements found throughout its pages.
There are myriad sections without references. At other times the authors reference secondary sources (in discussing toilet training they note that "Pediatrician Lindy Woodard believes that a child can and should be trained by thirty months; in her professional experience, children who are trained at an older age have more problems learning to use the toilet." p. 168). Often the subject of a section would lack focus and context, such as p. 209 where the authors talk about "soul disorders" in reference to mental health. One assumes they are referencing the work of someone else, but it isn't cited or put into context. This leaves the reader to wonder why the authors would consider if "wisdom teeth extraction impacts our souls."
Hi there! My name is Grace, I'm 23 years old and I've been nannying part and full time for 4 years and I very much enjoy it. To give you a little more background on myself and my experience - I'm a Certified Personal Trainer and I am Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED certified. I have previously worked at a standard daycare and Gold's Gym Kid's Club. As well as in home babysitting from 15 years old to current. I've nannied part time for 2 boys 6 and 8. Also nannied full-time for a baby from 2 months to 16 months. I have experience with infants, toddlers and older preteen/teen kids. I truly have an authentic love for children. I'm a multi-tasker and I make sure that everything I do is thorough and sufficient. I'm comfortable with running errand and doing housework. I'd like to think I'm a pretty easy going and fun babysitter while maintaining an authoritative figure while the parents are not present.
Perhaps the first sign that this book would be a let down were the typos throughout the pages (such as "hunbands" for husbands p 211, "sores" for scores p 104). The carelessness of the authors was reflected in the poor quality of the content and its presentation. This book lacked a coherent voice, and others have noted the contradictory statements found throughout its pages.
Hello my name is Nicole and together with my husband we run a very small in home day care. We have a unique program where our babies really grow up and learn together. We start with all new born babies then as they grow so does our daycare. We started as an infant nursery last year, then converted into a toddler nursery and now we are doing pre-school followed by a full preschool program next year. Then we will start over again!
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