Todays child care CO

Qualistar Colorado and its Qualistar Rating™ team partner with programs on the assessment phase of their quality improvement journey. Evidence of a high quality early learning experience can be found in many aspects of a program. Strong Family Partnerships, age-appropriate learning experiences, positive interactions between teachers and children, effective health and safety procedures, and the ongoing training and education of the program staff are just some of the critical areas that contribute to the quality of care provided to children and families. These and other criteria are assessed per program by the Rating team. Learn more about Qualistar Rating™ components and the rating process.
Currently 1 OPENING - ages 16 months through school aged! A native of Denver, I have provided licensed child care in my home since 1980. I have excellent references. I serve nutritious, high quality, home cooked meals. I offer an atmosphere where learning can take place in an easy, fun environment. There are plenty of outdoor experiences. Activities include daily story time and a Christian based preschool program. In the summer, children ages 3 and up may take daily swimming lessons offered through Parks and Recreation, usually for a period of 9 weeks, Monday - Thursday. Lessons are parent paid. Thank you.
There are myriad sections without references. At other times the authors reference secondary sources (in discussing toilet training they note that "Pediatrician Lindy Woodard believes that a child can and should be trained by thirty months; in her professional experience, children who are trained at an older age have more problems learning to use the toilet." p. 168). Often the subject of a section would lack focus and context, such as p. 209 where the authors talk about "soul disorders" in reference to mental health. One assumes they are referencing the work of someone else, but it isn't cited or put into context. This leaves the reader to wonder why the authors would consider if "wisdom teeth extraction impacts our souls."

- An apparent misunderstanding about baby-led weaning. The book says that baby-led weaning is to be resisted and that baby's parents should be squarely in charge of what baby eats from the beginning. I did a combination of purees and baby-led weaning with both my children, and I was always squarely in charge of what they ate and what they were offered. Part of my role as a mother is to prepare nourishing foods for my children. Whether they pick at it and hand-feed themselves or whether I offered it mushed up on a spoon is irrelevant. The book fails to recognise that a child can only choose food from that which they have been offered or is available. If only nourishing food is offered and available, then that is what the child will choose.
My son has a speech delay and is in daycare to help socialize him withother children as well as the rece’s are able to help him in ways I don’t know how as a first time parent this is a last resort as I’ve tried speech pathologist among other options this one is finally beginniNing to show some progress with these proposed changel to ratios this will be impossible young children will no longer get the necessary one on one time or quality educational curriculum also with the proposed age grouping changes many daycare facilities won’t offer infant care due to safety issues infants learning to walk put in with toddlers who are carelessly running around and in their hitting and biting phases PKEASE DO NOT GO THROUGH WITH THESE CHANGES. ~vienna Johnstone, concerned parent windsor Ontario
Although I anticipated the publishing of this book with excitement, I cannot recommend "The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care". Thank you for taking the time to read this review, and thank you for not clicking "unhelpful" simply because you disagree with my view. NT is a groundbreaking book, and I sincerely hope this book does not tarnish its reputation.
There is a lot to like about The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care by Sally Fallon Morrell and Thomas S Cowan. Some of it is exceptionally well-researched (other things I thought were a little sketchy or questionable, see further below). I could never list all the awesome things the book discusses, but some of the highlights for me include:
Otoacoustic emissions are clinically important because they are the basis of a simple, non-invasive test for hearing defects in newborn babies and in children who are too young to cooperate in conventional hearing tests. Many western countries now have national programmes for the universal hearing screening of newborn babies. Periodic early childhood hearing screenings program are also utilizing OAE technology. One excellent example has been demonstrated by the Early Childhood Hearing Outreach Initiative at the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management (NCHAM) at Utah State University, which has helped hundreds of Early Head Start programs across the United States implement OAE screening and follow-up practices in those early childhood educational settings.[8][9][10] The primary screening tool is a test for the presence of a click-evoked OAE. Otoacoustic emissions also assist in differential diagnosis of cochlear and higher level hearing losses (e.g., auditory neuropathy).
The relationships between otoacoustic emissions and tinnitus have been explored. Several studies suggest that in about 6% to 12% of normal-hearing persons with tinnitus and SOAEs, the SOAEs are at least partly responsible for the tinnitus.[11] Studies have found that some subjects with tinnitus display oscillating or ringing EOAEs, and in these cases, it is hypothesized that the oscillating EOAEs and tinnitus are related to a common underlying pathology rather than the emissions being the source of the tinnitus.[11]
It is NOT a different type of license or a substitute for licensing or accreditation. The intent of the Qualistar Rating™ is to give licensed programs a measurement of quality, by star levels, and recommendations on how to improve the quality of the care they provide. Accreditation by a national accrediting agency is a separate process that has its own set of standards and validation system.
- An apparent misunderstanding about baby-led weaning. The book says that baby-led weaning is to be resisted and that baby's parents should be squarely in charge of what baby eats from the beginning. I did a combination of purees and baby-led weaning with both my children, and I was always squarely in charge of what they ate and what they were offered. Part of my role as a mother is to prepare nourishing foods for my children. Whether they pick at it and hand-feed themselves or whether I offered it mushed up on a spoon is irrelevant. The book fails to recognise that a child can only choose food from that which they have been offered or is available. If only nourishing food is offered and available, then that is what the child will choose.
My whole life has been dedicated to the care of little ones. From helping my mother when I was young with her own in home daycare, to my first babysitting jobs. I then had the opportunity to be nanny to two wonderful girls ages 3 yrs. and 4 months for about 3 years. Then, I had them pleasure of spending 3 months in Romania working with an organization called Caminul Felix. They are essentially an orphanage but rather than caring for the children until they come of age, they give them homes and families for life. There I worked with many children befriending them, teaching crafts and helping with their English. Now I have started a family of my own and desire to have my own in home daycare. Doing as my mother did before me, caring for little ones and helping fellow mothers with trustworthy and affordable childcare. P. S. I am also more than happy to take care of any four-legged, furry family members.
I enjoyed reading Nourishing Traditions (NT) and have incorporated some of the information from that book into my family's diet. It also prompted me to delve into some areas of nutrition research that I hadn't read before NT. I expected this book to take a similar approach to child care (i.e. present qualitative and quantitative research, give an overview of historical trends, and present ideas from various cultures). I had high hopes for this book, since Sally Fallon was once again listed as an author, but after reading this book perhaps I should search for more from Mary Enig (the co-author of NT, but not on this book).
Thus, we propose that your government needs to withdraw proposed changes to age ranges, ratios and group sizes. Instead we recommend that the government develop a well-considered road map that begins with a clear vision, goals/objectives, targets and timetables, with regulatory changes as one part of this plan. This would have a better chance for successful policy change. We also call on Ontario to play a positive leadership role with the new federal Liberal government and other provinces/territories in developing the high quality universal integrated ECEC system that so many have been seeking for so long.    
The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby & Child Care makes the principles of traditional nutrition available to modern parents. The book provides holistic advice for pregnancy and newborn interventions, vaccinations, breastfeeding and child development, as well as a compendium of natural treatments for childhood illnesses, from autism to whooping cough. The work of Rudulf Steiner supports the book's emphasis on the child's spiritual requirement for imaginative play.
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