Todays child care CO

We have had our two children (and soon to be one more) enrolled at Orchard Valley for the last 2 years and we have been very pleased. The teachers are excellent and their curriculum is top notch! Our children absolutely love to go to school. Occasionally even on the weekends they will ask, "Can we go to school today?" Each and every day is new and exciting. They do crafts, enjoy outdoor play and they are always learning something new. We have had our children at another top notch daycare center previous to this one and we left that one to come to Orchard Valley for the education that they provide. There are other more expensive programs out there. But Orchard Valley is the top for the quality of care, education, and guidance that you receive for your money. All instructors are background checked and CPR certified. If there is a problem it gets resolved immediately. I also like their no tolerance for biting as well as their discipline policies. They really work with you and your family to raise your child together as a team. Also, they do a fantastic job with potty training making it a painless process for all. This is an A++++++++++++++ organization and we have recommended it many times to our friends for their childcare needs.
The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby & Child Care makes the principles of traditional nutrition available to modern parents. The book provides holistic advice for pregnancy and newborn interventions, vaccinations, breastfeeding and child development, as well as a compendium of natural treatments for childhood illnesses, from autism to whooping cough. The work of Rudulf Steiner supports the book's emphasis on the child's spiritual requirement for imaginative play.
We have had our two children (and soon to be one more) enrolled at Orchard Valley for the last 2 years and we have been very pleased. The teachers are excellent and their curriculum is top notch! Our children absolutely love to go to school. Occasionally even on the weekends they will ask, "Can we go to school today?" Each and every day is new and exciting. They do crafts, enjoy outdoor play and they are always learning something new. We have had our children at another top notch daycare center previous to this one and we left that one to come to Orchard Valley for the education that they provide. There are other more expensive programs out there. But Orchard Valley is the top for the quality of care, education, and guidance that you receive for your money. All instructors are background checked and CPR certified. If there is a problem it gets resolved immediately. I also like their no tolerance for biting as well as their discipline policies. They really work with you and your family to raise your child together as a team. Also, they do a fantastic job with potty training making it a painless process for all. This is an A++++++++++++++ organization and we have recommended it many times to our friends for their childcare needs.
Our parents have confidence each day that their child is being taken care of in a loving and respectful environment. We extend the offer to all families to come visit us and see why Children's Playland in Aurora is the perfect home away from home. We know that choosing care for your little one(s) is an important decision and greatly affects the life of your child and your family. We pride ourselves on our warm and loving teachers, phenomenal curriculums and the simple extras that make bringing your child to day care an easy and stress free event.
There are myriad sections without references. At other times the authors reference secondary sources (in discussing toilet training they note that "Pediatrician Lindy Woodard believes that a child can and should be trained by thirty months; in her professional experience, children who are trained at an older age have more problems learning to use the toilet." p. 168). Often the subject of a section would lack focus and context, such as p. 209 where the authors talk about "soul disorders" in reference to mental health. One assumes they are referencing the work of someone else, but it isn't cited or put into context. This leaves the reader to wonder why the authors would consider if "wisdom teeth extraction impacts our souls."
The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby & Child Care makes the principles of traditional nutrition available to modern parents. The book provides holistic advice for pregnancy and newborn interventions, vaccinations, breastfeeding and child development, as well as a compendium of natural treatments for childhood illnesses, from autism to whooping cough. The work of Rudulf Steiner supports the book's emphasis on the child's spiritual requirement for imaginative play.
In conjunction with audiometric testing, OAE testing can be completed to determine changes in the responses. Studies have found that exposure to noise can cause a decline in OAE responses. In a study, industrial workers who were exposed to 84.5 dBA of noise were compared to workers who were exposed to 53.2 dBA of noise by considering hearing thresholds and OAEs before and after 5 days of work. This study revealed that hearing thresholds and OAE results were significantly lower among the workers who were exposed to higher levels of noise.[12]

I enjoyed reading Nourishing Traditions (NT) and have incorporated some of the information from that book into my family's diet. It also prompted me to delve into some areas of nutrition research that I hadn't read before NT. I expected this book to take a similar approach to child care (i.e. present qualitative and quantitative research, give an overview of historical trends, and present ideas from various cultures). I had high hopes for this book, since Sally Fallon was once again listed as an author, but after reading this book perhaps I should search for more from Mary Enig (the co-author of NT, but not on this book).
There is a lot to like about The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care by Sally Fallon Morrell and Thomas S Cowan. Some of it is exceptionally well-researched (other things I thought were a little sketchy or questionable, see further below). I could never list all the awesome things the book discusses, but some of the highlights for me include:
When I graduate in June 2016, I will officially be an ECE. Throughout my studies, discussions of low recognition of ECEs, no National Framework, low wages for ECEs, etc have been hot topics. Learning that there is such a lack of help for ECEs is alarming, especially for someone fresh out of school in hopes of having this as a career, a way to provide for a family. Looking into a National Framework in the 2017-2018 budget is not helping families, ECEs, etc who need help NOW. Now is the time to make a difference for the future. Doing something in the future doesn’t help with the problems we face now.
There are myriad sections without references. At other times the authors reference secondary sources (in discussing toilet training they note that "Pediatrician Lindy Woodard believes that a child can and should be trained by thirty months; in her professional experience, children who are trained at an older age have more problems learning to use the toilet." p. 168). Often the subject of a section would lack focus and context, such as p. 209 where the authors talk about "soul disorders" in reference to mental health. One assumes they are referencing the work of someone else, but it isn't cited or put into context. This leaves the reader to wonder why the authors would consider if "wisdom teeth extraction impacts our souls."
Some of the child rearing advice was unexpected: p. 203 "no parents can really play with their children" because they have "too much responsibility, too many disappointments, too much school learning to play" and "Don't play with your children, just do your stuff-laundry, cooking, gardening, mowing the lawn, bird watching." Perhaps the authors began writing the section to stress the importance of letting children have creative play rather than structuring all playtime with activities and parental narration, but they composed a message of 'do your chores and leave your child to do his own thing.' Again, there were no references in this brief section, though there are plenty of sources the authors could have drawn from if they had done some research.
“Lucas has been enrolled at the Aurora, CO TLE since they opened their doors. He has learned so much and has loved all of his teachers. He has progressed from Preppers to Preschool 1 and now Preschool 2. I am confident he will be prepared for Kindergarten next year. Alyssa started in the infant room and has just moved to Twaddlers. Both kids love the center and the management and teachers have been wonderful. ”

There is a lot to like about The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care by Sally Fallon Morrell and Thomas S Cowan. Some of it is exceptionally well-researched (other things I thought were a little sketchy or questionable, see further below). I could never list all the awesome things the book discusses, but some of the highlights for me include:
In high school I was involved with sports (softball, basketball, track) was FFA vice president, and a member of the National Honor Society. After high school I received an athletic scholarship to play softball. While in college I started a physical education program at a local Lutheran Church School. The people and the children became family to me and I was offered a part time teaching assistant job working with the kindergarten class. During the summers of college I spent my time coaching softball to young girls. Over my four years of coaching we won four state titles, four regional titles, three Nationals appearances as well as an invitation to the Babe Ruth Little League World Series.
×