Todays child care CO

In 2009, Stephen Beeby of The University of Southampton led research into utilizing otoacoustic emissions for biometric identification. Devices equipped with a microphone could detect these subsonic emissions and potentially identify an individual, thereby providing access to the device, without the need of a traditional password.[15] It is speculated, however, that colds, medication, trimming one's ear hair, or recording and playing back a signal to the microphone could subvert the identification process.[16]

- An apparent misunderstanding about baby-led weaning. The book says that baby-led weaning is to be resisted and that baby's parents should be squarely in charge of what baby eats from the beginning. I did a combination of purees and baby-led weaning with both my children, and I was always squarely in charge of what they ate and what they were offered. Part of my role as a mother is to prepare nourishing foods for my children. Whether they pick at it and hand-feed themselves or whether I offered it mushed up on a spoon is irrelevant. The book fails to recognise that a child can only choose food from that which they have been offered or is available. If only nourishing food is offered and available, then that is what the child will choose.
I enjoyed reading Nourishing Traditions (NT) and have incorporated some of the information from that book into my family's diet. It also prompted me to delve into some areas of nutrition research that I hadn't read before NT. I expected this book to take a similar approach to child care (i.e. present qualitative and quantitative research, give an overview of historical trends, and present ideas from various cultures). I had high hopes for this book, since Sally Fallon was once again listed as an author, but after reading this book perhaps I should search for more from Mary Enig (the co-author of NT, but not on this book).

My name is Kara Downing but now days I go by Miss Kara. I grew up in south eastern Colorado on a 2500 acre farm with my brother and sister. I was the youngest sibling and always wanted a younger brother or sister. As a young child I was always helping take care of my younger cousins and I loved babysitting. My grandma was an elementary teacher and I remember going to help in her classroom and the idea of teaching seemed like so much fun. I believe all of these factors helped my find my passion with working with children.
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