Todays child care CO

There is a lot to like about The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care by Sally Fallon Morrell and Thomas S Cowan. Some of it is exceptionally well-researched (other things I thought were a little sketchy or questionable, see further below). I could never list all the awesome things the book discusses, but some of the highlights for me include:
I have loved working with kids since I was 12, shadowing a family friend in her in-home daycare, until I began working there at 14. I grew up in that environment starting at age 9 however, so I was always familiar to the process, if not involved. She took children from 3 mo to 6 yrs, and from there I worked at a summer camp with kids age 5 to 11, where I also coordinated birthday parties based on the parents' requests. Meanwhile working with various clients throughout the years. I recently worked in a center as an Infant Supervisor, but I prefer 1 on 1 with families so I went back to nannying! I've just had a little one of my own at the end of July, and took a little time off for baby, but I'll be back to work at the end of October. When I am ready I would prefer a full time family that is okay with him coming along with me. If this will work for you, please get back to me! I will look forward to meeting you in the future!

Although I anticipated the publishing of this book with excitement, I cannot recommend "The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care". Thank you for taking the time to read this review, and thank you for not clicking "unhelpful" simply because you disagree with my view. NT is a groundbreaking book, and I sincerely hope this book does not tarnish its reputation.
 Atlas Children's Academy is an early childhood education center that opens the world to  children of all backgrounds. Our unique  program builds community, provides strong academics and supports the growth of the whole child.  We are a licensed childcare provider that offers a wide range of activities that are fun and educational for age group 6 weeks to 12 years of age. 
I am a stay-at-home mom and have a 7-year-old son. I have been caring for other children for 9 years now. I am very flexible with scheduling, I enjoy watching other children, along with my son, so he can have some interaction with others, which is very important to me. I can come to your home, or your child(ren) could come to mine, whichever you're more comfortable with. I do not smoke and I have my own transportation, also am just fine with pets! I have no specific rate, it just depends on what works for the parents of the child(ren), I am caring for. It's usually between $9 to $12/hour.
It is hard to argue that a two year old with the proposed 1:8 adult: child ratio in a group of 24 is in a “quality” or even a safe environment.  While we are pleased with the proposal to increase the number of Registered Early Childhood Educators, research suggests that an increase in trained staff is not a trade-off for decent ratios and group sizes.  Additionally, the already-stretched, underpaid, 97% female child care workforce cannot continue to pick up the slack for massive gaps in public financing.  

Perhaps the first sign that this book would be a let down were the typos throughout the pages (such as "hunbands" for husbands p 211, "sores" for scores p 104). The carelessness of the authors was reflected in the poor quality of the content and its presentation. This book lacked a coherent voice, and others have noted the contradictory statements found throughout its pages.
The relationships between otoacoustic emissions and tinnitus have been explored. Several studies suggest that in about 6% to 12% of normal-hearing persons with tinnitus and SOAEs, the SOAEs are at least partly responsible for the tinnitus.[11] Studies have found that some subjects with tinnitus display oscillating or ringing EOAEs, and in these cases, it is hypothesized that the oscillating EOAEs and tinnitus are related to a common underlying pathology rather than the emissions being the source of the tinnitus.[11]
I am a stay-at-home mom of a 4-year-old boy and 1. 5-year-old boy. I am looking for an infant/toddler to watch in our home, in addition to my own boys. We are a smoke-free home and have a friendly Shih tzu dog who has been a part of our family since before my 1st son was born. I have 16 years of child care experience and have a Bachelor's Degree in Human Development and Family Studies. I have open availability during the week and am also available on nights and weekends too! I am very flexible when it comes to drop off and pick up times. I would love to be able to watch your child, teach them and allow them to grow and develop. Activities throughout the day will meet your child's physical, emotional and social needs. I would love the opportunity to help out your family in caring for your child.
- An apparent misunderstanding about baby-led weaning. The book says that baby-led weaning is to be resisted and that baby's parents should be squarely in charge of what baby eats from the beginning. I did a combination of purees and baby-led weaning with both my children, and I was always squarely in charge of what they ate and what they were offered. Part of my role as a mother is to prepare nourishing foods for my children. Whether they pick at it and hand-feed themselves or whether I offered it mushed up on a spoon is irrelevant. The book fails to recognise that a child can only choose food from that which they have been offered or is available. If only nourishing food is offered and available, then that is what the child will choose.
To me, this is the most important resource to have for raising healthy children. I am pregnant with my 2nd child and follow the extremely nutrient dense pregnancy diet from this book. I’ve also followed the food introduction schedule for my first born (3 yo now) to ensure he grows up loving and eating REAL FOOD- not crap food laced with sugar and chemicals like cereal, processed/boxed/bagged “foods”, juice, waffles, artificially colored anything, pizza, etc which gives children zero vitamins and nutrition. My son eats and loves broccoli, salmon, chicken, eggs, fruits, beans, nuts, cod liver oil, avocados, coconut oil, bone broth soups...all because of what I’ve read in this wonderful book. I truly believe because he has grown up on these nutrient dense foods and healthy fats like CLO, coconut oil and real butter, his memory is astounding (brains REQUIRE fats to function optimally!). I am constantly referring to it not just for diet, but for alternative cures for childhood sickness, how to make your home as healthy as possible, baby and child care, vaccines, supplementation, child milestones, recipes, to name a few. If you want to have a truly healthy pregnancy and child, this is the book to follow.
It has been found that distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE’s) have provided the most information for detecting mild hearing loss in high frequencies when compared to transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE).[13] This is an indication that DPOAE’s can help with detecting an early onset of noise-induced hearing loss. A study measuring audiometric thresholds and DPOAEs among individuals in the military showed that there was a decrease in DPOAEs after noise exposure, but did not show a shift in audiometric threshold. This supports OAEs as predicting early signs of noise damage.[14]
Although I anticipated the publishing of this book with excitement, I cannot recommend "The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care". Thank you for taking the time to read this review, and thank you for not clicking "unhelpful" simply because you disagree with my view. NT is a groundbreaking book, and I sincerely hope this book does not tarnish its reputation.
There is a lot to like about The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care by Sally Fallon Morrell and Thomas S Cowan. Some of it is exceptionally well-researched (other things I thought were a little sketchy or questionable, see further below). I could never list all the awesome things the book discusses, but some of the highlights for me include:
In 2009, Stephen Beeby of The University of Southampton led research into utilizing otoacoustic emissions for biometric identification. Devices equipped with a microphone could detect these subsonic emissions and potentially identify an individual, thereby providing access to the device, without the need of a traditional password.[15] It is speculated, however, that colds, medication, trimming one's ear hair, or recording and playing back a signal to the microphone could subvert the identification process.[16]

Some of the child rearing advice was unexpected: p. 203 "no parents can really play with their children" because they have "too much responsibility, too many disappointments, too much school learning to play" and "Don't play with your children, just do your stuff-laundry, cooking, gardening, mowing the lawn, bird watching." Perhaps the authors began writing the section to stress the importance of letting children have creative play rather than structuring all playtime with activities and parental narration, but they composed a message of 'do your chores and leave your child to do his own thing.' Again, there were no references in this brief section, though there are plenty of sources the authors could have drawn from if they had done some research.
We are Ontario parents, educators, service providers, academics and community members. We are very concerned about some of the regulatory changes your government has proposed for child care centres. We are especially troubled by the changes to age group composition that will have the effect of reducing staff: child ratios and increasing group sizes.
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