Todays child care CO

OAEs are considered to be related to the amplification function of the cochlea. In the absence of external stimulation, the activity of the cochlear amplifier increases, leading to the production of sound. Several lines of evidence suggest that, in mammals, outer hair cells are the elements that enhance cochlear sensitivity and frequency selectivity and hence act as the energy sources for amplification. One theory is that they act to increase the discriminability of signal variations in continuous noise by lowering the masking effect of its cochlear amplification.[4]


- A suggestion that it is not necessary to consume large amounts of water before and during pregnancy (p35). Apparently, the best way to hydrate your body is to 'consume plenty of healthy fats, because fats provide the most energy on the cellular level - much more than carbohydrates and proteins, and the by product of this energy is water'. I don't know enough about this matter to comment further at this stage, but I find it strange that drinking water would be discouraged.
At Bradford Early Education, we believe that children are on their own developmental journey and that children should be challenged based on their individual interests, needs and capabilities. We endeavor to prepare our children for their academic careers by using scientific principles and empirically supported methods. As a Bradford Early Education school, we teach from a unique and independent curriculum.
The relationships between otoacoustic emissions and tinnitus have been explored. Several studies suggest that in about 6% to 12% of normal-hearing persons with tinnitus and SOAEs, the SOAEs are at least partly responsible for the tinnitus.[11] Studies have found that some subjects with tinnitus display oscillating or ringing EOAEs, and in these cases, it is hypothesized that the oscillating EOAEs and tinnitus are related to a common underlying pathology rather than the emissions being the source of the tinnitus.[11]
I enjoyed reading Nourishing Traditions (NT) and have incorporated some of the information from that book into my family's diet. It also prompted me to delve into some areas of nutrition research that I hadn't read before NT. I expected this book to take a similar approach to child care (i.e. present qualitative and quantitative research, give an overview of historical trends, and present ideas from various cultures). I had high hopes for this book, since Sally Fallon was once again listed as an author, but after reading this book perhaps I should search for more from Mary Enig (the co-author of NT, but not on this book).
I am a stay-at-home mom and have a 7-year-old son. I have been caring for other children for 9 years now. I am very flexible with scheduling, I enjoy watching other children, along with my son, so he can have some interaction with others, which is very important to me. I can come to your home, or your child(ren) could come to mine, whichever you're more comfortable with. I do not smoke and I have my own transportation, also am just fine with pets! I have no specific rate, it just depends on what works for the parents of the child(ren), I am caring for. It's usually between $9 to $12/hour.
We are Ontario parents, educators, service providers, academics and community members. We are very concerned about some of the regulatory changes your government has proposed for child care centres. We are especially troubled by the changes to age group composition that will have the effect of reducing staff: child ratios and increasing group sizes.
My licensed home childcare will incorporate the experience and knowledge I have gained while working 13 years as a preschool teacher most of which was at a NAEYC accredited 4 Star Qualistar rated program. I am CPR/First Aid certified. I have a fenced in backyard and there is a park nearby. I absolutely LOVE spending my days watching children learn, grow, and experience the world around them, to me there is no other job as rewarding!
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