Todays child care CO

Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE)s are sounds that are emitted from the ear without external stimulation and are measurable with sensitive microphones in the external ear canal. At least one SOAE can be detected in approx. 35-50% of the population. The sounds are frequency-stable between 500 Hz and 4500 Hz to have unstable volumes between -30 dB SPL and +10 dB SPL. The majority of the people are unaware of their SOAEs; portions of 1-9% however perceive a SOAE as an annoying tinnitus.[5]

We recognize that there are good reasons to make changes in early childhood education and care (ECEC) in Ontario.  But we believe that these must be based on the best available evidence about what is of most benefit to children and families; we argue that these proposed changes are not. Additionally, we suggest that changes in ECEC in Ontario will continue to have negative effects if they continue to be “piecemeal”.


In 2009, Stephen Beeby of The University of Southampton led research into utilizing otoacoustic emissions for biometric identification. Devices equipped with a microphone could detect these subsonic emissions and potentially identify an individual, thereby providing access to the device, without the need of a traditional password.[15] It is speculated, however, that colds, medication, trimming one's ear hair, or recording and playing back a signal to the microphone could subvert the identification process.[16]


It has been found that distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE’s) have provided the most information for detecting mild hearing loss in high frequencies when compared to transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE).[13] This is an indication that DPOAE’s can help with detecting an early onset of noise-induced hearing loss. A study measuring audiometric thresholds and DPOAEs among individuals in the military showed that there was a decrease in DPOAEs after noise exposure, but did not show a shift in audiometric threshold. This supports OAEs as predicting early signs of noise damage.[14]
The Aurora Public Schools is committed to the policy that all persons shall have equal access to its programs, facilities, and employment and does not discriminate on the basis of race, age, color, creed, national origin, sexual orientation (which includes transgender), conditions related to pregnancy or childbirth, disability, religion, ancestry, sex or need for special education services, or genetic information for employment and provides equal access to the Boy Scouts and other designated youth groups. Career and technical education opportunities will be offered without regard to these protected classes. In adhering to this policy, the Aurora Public Schools abides by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act and Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

- An apparent misunderstanding about baby-led weaning. The book says that baby-led weaning is to be resisted and that baby's parents should be squarely in charge of what baby eats from the beginning. I did a combination of purees and baby-led weaning with both my children, and I was always squarely in charge of what they ate and what they were offered. Part of my role as a mother is to prepare nourishing foods for my children. Whether they pick at it and hand-feed themselves or whether I offered it mushed up on a spoon is irrelevant. The book fails to recognise that a child can only choose food from that which they have been offered or is available. If only nourishing food is offered and available, then that is what the child will choose.
It is hard to argue that a two year old with the proposed 1:8 adult: child ratio in a group of 24 is in a “quality” or even a safe environment.  While we are pleased with the proposal to increase the number of Registered Early Childhood Educators, research suggests that an increase in trained staff is not a trade-off for decent ratios and group sizes.  Additionally, the already-stretched, underpaid, 97% female child care workforce cannot continue to pick up the slack for massive gaps in public financing.  

We provide educational daycare in the greater Parker, CO area that focuses on days filled with learning and fun, the key ingredients of our Life Essentials® educational philosophy. The smiles you’ll see on our children’s faces as they learn, share family style meals with other children, and grow socially will delight you. The words from our children’s parents about our program, safety and facility will impress you.

I have loved working with kids since I was 12, shadowing a family friend in her in-home daycare, until I began working there at 14. I grew up in that environment starting at age 9 however, so I was always familiar to the process, if not involved. She took children from 3 mo to 6 yrs, and from there I worked at a summer camp with kids age 5 to 11, where I also coordinated birthday parties based on the parents' requests. Meanwhile working with various clients throughout the years. I recently worked in a center as an Infant Supervisor, but I prefer 1 on 1 with families so I went back to nannying! I've just had a little one of my own at the end of July, and took a little time off for baby, but I'll be back to work at the end of October. When I am ready I would prefer a full time family that is okay with him coming along with me. If this will work for you, please get back to me! I will look forward to meeting you in the future!
Care.com does not employ any care provider or care seeker nor is it responsible for the conduct of any care provider or care seeker. Care.com provides information and tools to help care seekers and care providers connect and make informed decisions. However, each individual is solely responsible for selecting an appropriate care provider or care seeker for themselves or their families and for complying with all applicable laws in connection with any employment relationship they establish. The information contained in member profiles, job posts and applications are supplied by care providers and care seekers themselves and is not information generated or verified by Care.com. Care.com does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment or engage in any conduct that requires a professional license.
×