Todays child care CO

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Qualistar Colorado and its Qualistar Rating™ team partner with programs on the assessment phase of their quality improvement journey. Evidence of a high quality early learning experience can be found in many aspects of a program. Strong Family Partnerships, age-appropriate learning experiences, positive interactions between teachers and children, effective health and safety procedures, and the ongoing training and education of the program staff are just some of the critical areas that contribute to the quality of care provided to children and families. These and other criteria are assessed per program by the Rating team. Learn more about Qualistar Rating™ components and the rating process.

Some of the child rearing advice was unexpected: p. 203 "no parents can really play with their children" because they have "too much responsibility, too many disappointments, too much school learning to play" and "Don't play with your children, just do your stuff-laundry, cooking, gardening, mowing the lawn, bird watching." Perhaps the authors began writing the section to stress the importance of letting children have creative play rather than structuring all playtime with activities and parental narration, but they composed a message of 'do your chores and leave your child to do his own thing.' Again, there were no references in this brief section, though there are plenty of sources the authors could have drawn from if they had done some research.

The children at The Meadows spend at least 2 hours outside daily, we are the only school that writes this into our curriculum. We have many learning centers outside and our teachers take the curriculum that they develop outside to help engage the children in different environments. If the weather is too poor to go outside then we have an indoor playroom with a gigantic hand painted two level castle complete with slide, ball pit, dragon cave and fairy garden to engage their gross motor skill and help them burn off energy!


There are myriad sections without references. At other times the authors reference secondary sources (in discussing toilet training they note that "Pediatrician Lindy Woodard believes that a child can and should be trained by thirty months; in her professional experience, children who are trained at an older age have more problems learning to use the toilet." p. 168). Often the subject of a section would lack focus and context, such as p. 209 where the authors talk about "soul disorders" in reference to mental health. One assumes they are referencing the work of someone else, but it isn't cited or put into context. This leaves the reader to wonder why the authors would consider if "wisdom teeth extraction impacts our souls."
Our mission is to create a safe, positive, and loving environment for children with an emphasis on early education and childhood development. We strive to provide an optimal learning atmosphere, which is developmentally appropriate and a setting in which every child can experience success and develop confidence and independence. We attain these goals through guidance and leadership from qualified, caring and dedicated early childhood teachers. We strive to prepare our children for success in their academic careers by providing numerous activities for cognitive development, including both structured and independent learning opportunities.
I must admit I am surprised that with the concept of Nourishing Traditions being about adopting traditional methods of preparing foods as observed in ultra-healthy non-western people groups, I expected the book on baby and child care to promote more traditional and indigenous ways of nurturing (not just nourishing) little ones, such as babywearing and co-sleeping. I guess we always have The Continuum Concept by Jean Liedloff for that!
The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby & Child Care makes the principles of traditional nutrition available to modern parents. The book provides holistic advice for pregnancy and newborn interventions, vaccinations, breastfeeding and child development, as well as a compendium of natural treatments for childhood illnesses, from autism to whooping cough. The work of Rudulf Steiner supports the book's emphasis on the child's spiritual requirement for imaginative play.
We recognize that there are good reasons to make changes in early childhood education and care (ECEC) in Ontario.  But we believe that these must be based on the best available evidence about what is of most benefit to children and families; we argue that these proposed changes are not. Additionally, we suggest that changes in ECEC in Ontario will continue to have negative effects if they continue to be “piecemeal”.
It is hard to argue that a two year old with the proposed 1:8 adult: child ratio in a group of 24 is in a “quality” or even a safe environment.  While we are pleased with the proposal to increase the number of Registered Early Childhood Educators, research suggests that an increase in trained staff is not a trade-off for decent ratios and group sizes.  Additionally, the already-stretched, underpaid, 97% female child care workforce cannot continue to pick up the slack for massive gaps in public financing.  

- "Attachment parentings can interfere with a child's need to learn about the world on his own, and his gradual emergence into his sense of independent self" (p156). Clearly, the authors have confused attachment parenting with helicopter parenting. One of the greatest outcomes of attachment parenting is confident and secure children who are not only independent, but highly inter-dependent.
I was lucky enough to come in contact with Sheila after going through numerous babysitters/child care providers who either my kids did not like or the babysitter/child care provider could no longer care for my children. After bouncing around from provider to provider, I was relieved to find Angel Camp where my girls are thrilled about spending each day there. They are very well taken care of, happy, and I have no worries about my children during the day. She keeps in good contact with me so I always know the status of my children and how their day is going. It means the world to me knowing my children are in good hands. 
My name is Kara Downing but now days I go by Miss Kara. I grew up in south eastern Colorado on a 2500 acre farm with my brother and sister. I was the youngest sibling and always wanted a younger brother or sister. As a young child I was always helping take care of my younger cousins and I loved babysitting. My grandma was an elementary teacher and I remember going to help in her classroom and the idea of teaching seemed like so much fun. I believe all of these factors helped my find my passion with working with children.
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