Todays child care CO

The benefits of high quality early learning experiences for children appeal to both early childhood programs and families. By participating in the Qualistar Rating™ programs receive a detailed Quality Performance Profile© (QPP) that includes strengths and areas for improvement specific to their program and classrooms. Families benefit by accessing the program’s Quality Rating Report and by gaining an understanding of the components contributing to quality early learning experiences. This helps parents make more informed choices on the type of care they would like for their child.

I am a caregiver and excited to open my home for your child. I have three children of my own, one in college, one in elementary school and a toddler, so I am very experienced with all age groups. We follow a routine that includes preschool age appropriate activities in the morning. I enjoy reading time at the library and highly encourage supervised outdoor play in my fenced backyard. I lead an active healthy lifestyle. That includes a balanced diet for the children I care for. I am a mature, patient caregiver.


Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAE)s are sounds that are emitted from the ear without external stimulation and are measurable with sensitive microphones in the external ear canal. At least one SOAE can be detected in approx. 35-50% of the population. The sounds are frequency-stable between 500 Hz and 4500 Hz to have unstable volumes between -30 dB SPL and +10 dB SPL. The majority of the people are unaware of their SOAEs; portions of 1-9% however perceive a SOAE as an annoying tinnitus.[5]
It has been found that distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE’s) have provided the most information for detecting mild hearing loss in high frequencies when compared to transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE).[13] This is an indication that DPOAE’s can help with detecting an early onset of noise-induced hearing loss. A study measuring audiometric thresholds and DPOAEs among individuals in the military showed that there was a decrease in DPOAEs after noise exposure, but did not show a shift in audiometric threshold. This supports OAEs as predicting early signs of noise damage.[14]

We believe that caring for and educating children is a noble and enriching task and we take pride in our responsibility to educate young minds and prepare children for the future. We understand how important it is to trust the people who are responsible for the care and education of your child. With over 30 years of experience in the early childhood education industry, we are dedicated to providing children with the tools to succeed in a safe and nurturing environment.


Some of the child rearing advice was unexpected: p. 203 "no parents can really play with their children" because they have "too much responsibility, too many disappointments, too much school learning to play" and "Don't play with your children, just do your stuff-laundry, cooking, gardening, mowing the lawn, bird watching." Perhaps the authors began writing the section to stress the importance of letting children have creative play rather than structuring all playtime with activities and parental narration, but they composed a message of 'do your chores and leave your child to do his own thing.' Again, there were no references in this brief section, though there are plenty of sources the authors could have drawn from if they had done some research.

- Promotion of the time-out technique for dealing with inappropriate behaviour (p173). I've worked with enough children in my career and read enough literature on child behaviour and development to know that time-out is an ineffective, overused and misunderstood tool that adults resort to when they have no clue otherwise how to deal with their child's actions (thank you Super Nanny). In many cases it's the parents who need time out from the situation to cool down and gather their composure. I'm not about to tell anyone how to parent, but I will say that when a child is sent to time-out to 'think about their behaviour', you can be guaranteed they're thinking of anything BUT that.

We are Ontario parents, educators, service providers, academics and community members. We are very concerned about some of the regulatory changes your government has proposed for child care centres. We are especially troubled by the changes to age group composition that will have the effect of reducing staff: child ratios and increasing group sizes.


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Deciding which child care center you trust to take care of your child is no easy choice to make. With 19 preschools and child development centers in ZIP Code 80016, we like your chances. Take a look at the options below and see the great services they have to offer your family. Be sure to check out the reviews and past inspection information on the provider listing, and if you have any past experience with a provider, please leave an honest review to help other parents in a similar situation.
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