Todays child care CO

I have loved working with kids since I was 12, shadowing a family friend in her in-home daycare, until I began working there at 14. I grew up in that environment starting at age 9 however, so I was always familiar to the process, if not involved. She took children from 3 mo to 6 yrs, and from there I worked at a summer camp with kids age 5 to 11, where I also coordinated birthday parties based on the parents' requests. Meanwhile working with various clients throughout the years. I recently worked in a center as an Infant Supervisor, but I prefer 1 on 1 with families so I went back to nannying! I've just had a little one of my own at the end of July, and took a little time off for baby, but I'll be back to work at the end of October. When I am ready I would prefer a full time family that is okay with him coming along with me. If this will work for you, please get back to me! I will look forward to meeting you in the future!
In high school I was involved with sports (softball, basketball, track) was FFA vice president, and a member of the National Honor Society. After high school I received an athletic scholarship to play softball. While in college I started a physical education program at a local Lutheran Church School. The people and the children became family to me and I was offered a part time teaching assistant job working with the kindergarten class. During the summers of college I spent my time coaching softball to young girls. Over my four years of coaching we won four state titles, four regional titles, three Nationals appearances as well as an invitation to the Babe Ruth Little League World Series.
There are myriad sections without references. At other times the authors reference secondary sources (in discussing toilet training they note that "Pediatrician Lindy Woodard believes that a child can and should be trained by thirty months; in her professional experience, children who are trained at an older age have more problems learning to use the toilet." p. 168). Often the subject of a section would lack focus and context, such as p. 209 where the authors talk about "soul disorders" in reference to mental health. One assumes they are referencing the work of someone else, but it isn't cited or put into context. This leaves the reader to wonder why the authors would consider if "wisdom teeth extraction impacts our souls."
There is a lot to like about The Nourishing Traditions Book of Baby and Child Care by Sally Fallon Morrell and Thomas S Cowan. Some of it is exceptionally well-researched (other things I thought were a little sketchy or questionable, see further below). I could never list all the awesome things the book discusses, but some of the highlights for me include:
I enjoyed reading Nourishing Traditions (NT) and have incorporated some of the information from that book into my family's diet. It also prompted me to delve into some areas of nutrition research that I hadn't read before NT. I expected this book to take a similar approach to child care (i.e. present qualitative and quantitative research, give an overview of historical trends, and present ideas from various cultures). I had high hopes for this book, since Sally Fallon was once again listed as an author, but after reading this book perhaps I should search for more from Mary Enig (the co-author of NT, but not on this book).

We believe that caring for and educating children is a noble and enriching task and we take pride in our responsibility to educate young minds and prepare children for the future. We understand how important it is to trust the people who are responsible for the care and education of your child. With over 30 years of experience in the early childhood education industry, we are dedicated to providing children with the tools to succeed in a safe and nurturing environment.
The validity of this information is not guaranteed. Such validity should be done by the user. Daycare.com suggests verifying all listed daycare facility information by contacting your state childcare licensing department. This information is posted at the State Licensing Standards Section. Daycare.com does not endorse, license, nor otherwise recommend listings found on Daycare.com. Please read our disclaimer before continuing.
Early childhood is a time of remarkable brain development. The education that children receive during these years creates the foundation for their future growth, development and learning potential. At The Learning Experience®, we are dedicated to cultivating creative, compassionate and innovative young minds through our proprietary curriculum and enrichment programs that increase learning during six critical stages of early development. Our programs have been built to help children maximize their cognitive, physical and social potential. Or as we say at TLE®, we help children "learn, play and grow!" We believe that how children learn is as important as what they learn, that's why our educational programs are designed to inspire children's love of learning through hands-on lessons that make their educational experience fun! Daily lessons promote positive engagement throughout the day and include phonics, sign language, manners and etiquette, philanthropy, foreign language and hands-on technology. Enrichment programs such as yoga, soccer, drama, dance and music are also offered at no additional cost. Whether you have an inquisitive infant, tenacious toddler or passionate preschooler, put your child on the path to success and discover how we help children reach their full potential at The Learning Experience®!
I enjoyed reading Nourishing Traditions (NT) and have incorporated some of the information from that book into my family's diet. It also prompted me to delve into some areas of nutrition research that I hadn't read before NT. I expected this book to take a similar approach to child care (i.e. present qualitative and quantitative research, give an overview of historical trends, and present ideas from various cultures). I had high hopes for this book, since Sally Fallon was once again listed as an author, but after reading this book perhaps I should search for more from Mary Enig (the co-author of NT, but not on this book).
I have loved working with kids since I was 12, shadowing a family friend in her in-home daycare, until I began working there at 14. I grew up in that environment starting at age 9 however, so I was always familiar to the process, if not involved. She took children from 3 mo to 6 yrs, and from there I worked at a summer camp with kids age 5 to 11, where I also coordinated birthday parties based on the parents' requests. Meanwhile working with various clients throughout the years. I recently worked in a center as an Infant Supervisor, but I prefer 1 on 1 with families so I went back to nannying! I've just had a little one of my own at the end of July, and took a little time off for baby, but I'll be back to work at the end of October. When I am ready I would prefer a full time family that is okay with him coming along with me. If this will work for you, please get back to me! I will look forward to meeting you in the future!
- A suggestion that it is not necessary to consume large amounts of water before and during pregnancy (p35). Apparently, the best way to hydrate your body is to 'consume plenty of healthy fats, because fats provide the most energy on the cellular level - much more than carbohydrates and proteins, and the by product of this energy is water'. I don't know enough about this matter to comment further at this stage, but I find it strange that drinking water would be discouraged.
The relationships between otoacoustic emissions and tinnitus have been explored. Several studies suggest that in about 6% to 12% of normal-hearing persons with tinnitus and SOAEs, the SOAEs are at least partly responsible for the tinnitus.[11] Studies have found that some subjects with tinnitus display oscillating or ringing EOAEs, and in these cases, it is hypothesized that the oscillating EOAEs and tinnitus are related to a common underlying pathology rather than the emissions being the source of the tinnitus.[11]
- "Attachment parentings can interfere with a child's need to learn about the world on his own, and his gradual emergence into his sense of independent self" (p156). Clearly, the authors have confused attachment parenting with helicopter parenting. One of the greatest outcomes of attachment parenting is confident and secure children who are not only independent, but highly inter-dependent.
Shawna Kay – Mom of two children in care. My youngest isn’t quite 1 yr old yet. How much more difficult do you need to make it for us? I barely make enough to cover daycare as it is, and that’s WITH subsidy! The ripple effect here is going to negatively impact so many. Please think of how much these changes are HURTING people who are just scraping by as it is!!!!
Disclaimer: We at ChildcareCenter strive daily to keep our listings accurate and up-to-date, and to provide top-level, practical information that you can use and trust. However, ChildcareCenter.us does not endorse or recommend any of the childcare providers listed on its site, cannot be held responsible or liable in any way for your dealings with them, and does not guarantee the accuracy of listings on its site. We provide this site as a directory to assist you in locating childcare providers in your area. We do not own or operate any child care facility, and make no representation of any of the listings contained within ChildcareCenter.us.
×