Todays child care CO

Perhaps the first sign that this book would be a let down were the typos throughout the pages (such as "hunbands" for husbands p 211, "sores" for scores p 104). The carelessness of the authors was reflected in the poor quality of the content and its presentation. This book lacked a coherent voice, and others have noted the contradictory statements found throughout its pages.
It is NOT a different type of license or a substitute for licensing or accreditation. The intent of the Qualistar Rating™ is to give licensed programs a measurement of quality, by star levels, and recommendations on how to improve the quality of the care they provide. Accreditation by a national accrediting agency is a separate process that has its own set of standards and validation system.
I enjoyed reading Nourishing Traditions (NT) and have incorporated some of the information from that book into my family's diet. It also prompted me to delve into some areas of nutrition research that I hadn't read before NT. I expected this book to take a similar approach to child care (i.e. present qualitative and quantitative research, give an overview of historical trends, and present ideas from various cultures). I had high hopes for this book, since Sally Fallon was once again listed as an author, but after reading this book perhaps I should search for more from Mary Enig (the co-author of NT, but not on this book).
- A suggestion that it is not necessary to consume large amounts of water before and during pregnancy (p35). Apparently, the best way to hydrate your body is to 'consume plenty of healthy fats, because fats provide the most energy on the cellular level - much more than carbohydrates and proteins, and the by product of this energy is water'. I don't know enough about this matter to comment further at this stage, but I find it strange that drinking water would be discouraged.
The children at The Meadows spend at least 2 hours outside daily, we are the only school that writes this into our curriculum. We have many learning centers outside and our teachers take the curriculum that they develop outside to help engage the children in different environments. If the weather is too poor to go outside then we have an indoor playroom with a gigantic hand painted two level castle complete with slide, ball pit, dragon cave and fairy garden to engage their gross motor skill and help them burn off energy!

I enjoyed reading Nourishing Traditions (NT) and have incorporated some of the information from that book into my family's diet. It also prompted me to delve into some areas of nutrition research that I hadn't read before NT. I expected this book to take a similar approach to child care (i.e. present qualitative and quantitative research, give an overview of historical trends, and present ideas from various cultures). I had high hopes for this book, since Sally Fallon was once again listed as an author, but after reading this book perhaps I should search for more from Mary Enig (the co-author of NT, but not on this book).
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