Todays child care CO

My name is Kara Downing but now days I go by Miss Kara. I grew up in south eastern Colorado on a 2500 acre farm with my brother and sister. I was the youngest sibling and always wanted a younger brother or sister. As a young child I was always helping take care of my younger cousins and I loved babysitting. My grandma was an elementary teacher and I remember going to help in her classroom and the idea of teaching seemed like so much fun. I believe all of these factors helped my find my passion with working with children.
After obtaining my degree in Human Development and Family Studies from Colorado State University in the year 2008 I moved to Denver Colorado and I am now proud to call this city my home! My first job here in Denver I worked for Knowledge Beginnings Corporation as an infant room supervisor and later became the pre-Kindergarten teacher. From this experience I gained the confidence to start my own daycare program. I now own and operate a licensed family childcare home out of my basement called Parkfield Playhouse. I am CPR and First Aid certified and do over 15 hours of continued education every year. I offer preschool curriculum and am part of a state funded food program that offers nutritional education to ensure that each child gets healthy food for each meal. I offer breakfast, am snack, lunch, pm snack and dinner.
I enjoyed reading Nourishing Traditions (NT) and have incorporated some of the information from that book into my family's diet. It also prompted me to delve into some areas of nutrition research that I hadn't read before NT. I expected this book to take a similar approach to child care (i.e. present qualitative and quantitative research, give an overview of historical trends, and present ideas from various cultures). I had high hopes for this book, since Sally Fallon was once again listed as an author, but after reading this book perhaps I should search for more from Mary Enig (the co-author of NT, but not on this book).

Otoacoustic emissions are clinically important because they are the basis of a simple, non-invasive test for hearing defects in newborn babies and in children who are too young to cooperate in conventional hearing tests. Many western countries now have national programmes for the universal hearing screening of newborn babies. Periodic early childhood hearing screenings program are also utilizing OAE technology. One excellent example has been demonstrated by the Early Childhood Hearing Outreach Initiative at the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management (NCHAM) at Utah State University, which has helped hundreds of Early Head Start programs across the United States implement OAE screening and follow-up practices in those early childhood educational settings.[8][9][10] The primary screening tool is a test for the presence of a click-evoked OAE. Otoacoustic emissions also assist in differential diagnosis of cochlear and higher level hearing losses (e.g., auditory neuropathy).
Perhaps the first sign that this book would be a let down were the typos throughout the pages (such as "hunbands" for husbands p 211, "sores" for scores p 104). The carelessness of the authors was reflected in the poor quality of the content and its presentation. This book lacked a coherent voice, and others have noted the contradictory statements found throughout its pages.
There are myriad sections without references. At other times the authors reference secondary sources (in discussing toilet training they note that "Pediatrician Lindy Woodard believes that a child can and should be trained by thirty months; in her professional experience, children who are trained at an older age have more problems learning to use the toilet." p. 168). Often the subject of a section would lack focus and context, such as p. 209 where the authors talk about "soul disorders" in reference to mental health. One assumes they are referencing the work of someone else, but it isn't cited or put into context. This leaves the reader to wonder why the authors would consider if "wisdom teeth extraction impacts our souls."
All personal items must be labeled. All staff are CPR/AED/1st Aid certified and have childcare experience. Children will be released only to those individuals who initially dropped them off. Individuals must be 18 years old to pick up a child from the nursery. You are welcome to bring a small snack, however we do not allow any peanut products of any kind. No snacks are provided by staff. Please no sick children
At Bradford Early Education, we believe that children are on their own developmental journey and that children should be challenged based on their individual interests, needs and capabilities. We endeavor to prepare our children for their academic careers by using scientific principles and empirically supported methods. As a Bradford Early Education school, we teach from a unique and independent curriculum.

Disclaimer: We at ChildcareCenter strive daily to keep our listings accurate and up-to-date, and to provide top-level, practical information that you can use and trust. However, ChildcareCenter.us does not endorse or recommend any of the childcare providers listed on its site, cannot be held responsible or liable in any way for your dealings with them, and does not guarantee the accuracy of listings on its site. We provide this site as a directory to assist you in locating childcare providers in your area. We do not own or operate any child care facility, and make no representation of any of the listings contained within ChildcareCenter.us.
×